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Earth of fire

Actualité volcanique, Articles de fond sur étude de volcan, tectonique, récits et photos de voyage

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Actualités volcaniques
Kilauea - the plume of explosion at crater Overlook May 17, 2018 - seen Mauna Loa's webcam at 5:30 - Doc. HVO - USGS

Kilauea - the plume of explosion at crater Overlook May 17, 2018 - seen Mauna Loa's webcam at 5:30 - Doc. HVO - USGS

An HVO - USGS statement reports a top explosion at Kilauea Overlook Crater this 17 May at 4:15 UTC / 16 May 1815 HST; it was accompanied by a plume of ash that rose to 9,100 meters asl., drifting to the northeast, and was followed by continuous ash emissions, reaching 3,650 meters asl.

According to BBC News, the staff of the Observatory and the National Park have been evacuated preventively.

The activity can become more explosive at any time, with an increase in ash production and possible ballistic projections near the vent.

It is advisable to stay confined during the period of falling ash, and be very careful in case of driving that can be made slippery.

Kilauea - sismo. of the explosion this 17.05.2018 - left,  scale HST 18:15 on 16.05 - right, scale UTC 4:15 on 17.05.2018

Kilauea - sismo. of the explosion this 17.05.2018 - left,  scale HST 18:15 on 16.05 - right, scale UTC 4:15 on 17.05.2018

USGS scientists use Ash3D computer simulations to show how far ash might travel and how much ash might fall to the ground. This graphic shows today's simulation (May 17, 2018) for the explosive eruption at Kīlauea’s summit. The model uses wind and weather data, along with eruption parameters like plume height and ash content, to forecast where ash clouds might move and where deposits might land. The color contour lines represent areas of equal ash thickness on the ground. The inner blue line indicates a local "minor" deposit of 1/32 inch. The outer red line represents a "trace" amount of up to 1/256 inch. Local conditions may vary, such that small accumulations of ash may occur beyond the "Trace" contour.

USGS scientists use Ash3D computer simulations to show how far ash might travel and how much ash might fall to the ground. This graphic shows today's simulation (May 17, 2018) for the explosive eruption at Kīlauea’s summit. The model uses wind and weather data, along with eruption parameters like plume height and ash content, to forecast where ash clouds might move and where deposits might land. The color contour lines represent areas of equal ash thickness on the ground. The inner blue line indicates a local "minor" deposit of 1/32 inch. The outer red line represents a "trace" amount of up to 1/256 inch. Local conditions may vary, such that small accumulations of ash may occur beyond the "Trace" contour.

Here is a model run update with more recent wind and weather conditions. - HVO- USGS

Here is a model run update with more recent wind and weather conditions. - HVO- USGS

Sources: HVO - USGS, Civil Defense Hawaii, BBC News

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