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Earth of fire

Actualité volcanique, Articles de fond sur étude de volcan, tectonique, récits et photos de voyage

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #volcanic activity
Ubinas - the crater seen on 28.07.2019 by Digital globe - Worldview 2, via Ingemmet

Ubinas - the crater seen on 28.07.2019 by Digital globe - Worldview 2, via Ingemmet

Thanks to satellite images by visible infrared radiometers (VIIRS), thermal anomalies are observed on the edges of the Ubinas volcano crater. This corresponds to the presence of a body of lava / lava plug about 180 m. diameter at the base of the crater, which would prevent the emission of gas and ash.

The specialists of the OVI (Volcanological Observatory of INGEMMET) indicate that volcanic gases will gradually accumulate inside the chimney ... a fact likely to lead to a new explosive eruption with fragmentation of the lava which will be projected in blocks in a radius of about 2 to 3 km from the crater. Significant ash emissions would also affect areas within 30 km of the volcano.

At the seismicity level, during the 7-day period, 2,295 earthquakes with a magnitude of less than 2 were recorded, including a percentage related to the rise and movements of fluids.

 

Sources: Peru IG, Agencia Espacial del Peru and Diario El Peruano

Ubinas - photo Agencia Espacial del Peru / Conida from 01.08.2019

Ubinas - photo Agencia Espacial del Peru / Conida from 01.08.2019

The Sabancaya is not left ... for the period from 22 to 28 July 2019, 1899 volcanic earthquakes, the highest percentage of which is associated with the movement of magmatic fluids, were enumerated.

During this week, there was an average of 13 daily blasts of average to low intensity. Plumes of gas and ash up to 2.3 km above the summit of the volcano were observed, which dispersed in sectors NE, E and SE of Sabancaya.

The monitoring of the deformation of the volcanic structure, using GNSS data (processed with fast orbits), presents no significant anomalies.

Satellite monitoring identified 8 volcanic thermal anomalies on the volcano, ranging from 2 to 26 MW, associated with the presence of a hot body near the surface and the persistence of explosions.

It is recommended not to approach a radius of less than 12 km from the crater.

 

Sources: IG Peru, Agencia Espacial del Peru

Sabancaya - table summarizing the activity of the past week 22 to 28.07.2019 - Doc. IG Peru

Sabancaya - table summarizing the activity of the past week 22 to 28.07.2019 - Doc. IG Peru

Sabancaya - plume at 2,900 m. the 25.07.2019 / 13h44 - webcam IGP

Sabancaya - plume at 2,900 m. the 25.07.2019 / 13h44 - webcam IGP

Sabancaya - photo Agencia Espacial del Peru / Conida from 01.08.2019

Sabancaya - photo Agencia Espacial del Peru / Conida from 01.08.2019

On August 2 at 0:43 WIB, a new phreatic eruption occurred at Tangkuban Parahu ; the recording lasted 3 minutes 6 seconds, with a maximum amplitude of 50 mm.

The same day, other episodes were recorded at 1:45, 3:57 and 4:06 WIB, and continue.

In addition to a continuous tremor of dominant amplitude at 50 mm and four eruption earthquakes, low local inflation and an increase in the concentration of volcanic gases are measured. A white to gray plume of varying intensity is observed.

Due to the instability of the volcano, and the different parameters analyzed, the level of activity of the Tangkuban Parahu has been increased to 2 / waspada, together with a forbidden zone of 1,500 meters radius around the active crater.

 

Sources: PVMBG, Magma Indonesia, BNPB

Tangkuban Parahu - white plume on 02.08.2019 / 6h17 WIB - photo Magma Indonesia

Tangkuban Parahu - white plume on 02.08.2019 / 6h17 WIB - photo Magma Indonesia

Tangkuban Parahu - respectively 02.08.19 at 18:07, and 03.08.19 at 8:57 - webcam PVMBG - one click to enlargeTangkuban Parahu - respectively 02.08.19 at 18:07, and 03.08.19 at 8:57 - webcam PVMBG - one click to enlarge

Tangkuban Parahu - respectively 02.08.19 at 18:07, and 03.08.19 at 8:57 - webcam PVMBG - one click to enlarge

Tangkuban Parahu - summary of activity 02.08.2019 - Doc. PVMBG

Tangkuban Parahu - summary of activity 02.08.2019 - Doc. PVMBG

At Kilauea, the seismicity and strain ratios remain stable; low emissions of sulfur dioxide since September 2018.

Insight from July 25, 2019, a green pond marks the floor of Halema'uma'u, at about 540 meters above sea level.

HVO scientists flew over the summit of Kilauea in the morning of 1 August and confirm the presence of water at the bottom of Halima'uma'u crater. Observers saw reflections from the green pond. The pond has clearly expanded since the oldest photos made on July 25th.
With the presence of confirmed water, HVO scientists can now begin to think about the implications of water in the crater. Until a better understanding of its origin, it is impossible to understand its importance.

 

Source: HVO - link

Kilauea - Aerial view of Halema'uma'u at the top of Kīlauea taken during a helicopter flight over the US Observatory of Hawaii Volcano by Hawaii, August 1, 2019. The small green spot visible in Halema'uma'u is a new pond that forms at the lowest point of the crater. The pond is located at about 540 m altitude. USGS photo of S. Conway.

Kilauea - Aerial view of Halema'uma'u at the top of Kīlauea taken during a helicopter flight over the US Observatory of Hawaii Volcano by Hawaii, August 1, 2019. The small green spot visible in Halema'uma'u is a new pond that forms at the lowest point of the crater. The pond is located at about 540 m altitude. USGS photo of S. Conway.

Kiluaea - Telephoto shots of Halema'uma'u bottom water taken during a helicopter lidar survey on July 25, 2019 (left), when the basin was observed for the first time, and a USGS flyby on August 1, 2019 (right). . The size and depth of the pond increased slightly between the two dates; an "x" marks the same rock on both photos for comparison purposes. Left picture courtesy of Ron Chapelle, Quantum Spatial. USGS photo (right) of S. Conway.

Kiluaea - Telephoto shots of Halema'uma'u bottom water taken during a helicopter lidar survey on July 25, 2019 (left), when the basin was observed for the first time, and a USGS flyby on August 1, 2019 (right). . The size and depth of the pond increased slightly between the two dates; an "x" marks the same rock on both photos for comparison purposes. Left picture courtesy of Ron Chapelle, Quantum Spatial. USGS photo (right) of S. Conway.

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