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Earth of fire

Actualité volcanique, Articles de fond sur étude de volcan, tectonique, récits et photos de voyage

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #volcanic activity

Monthly summary of the activity of the Kīlauea volcano, which is not erupting. Monitoring data for May shows variable but typical rates of seismicity and soil deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions and only minor geological changes since eruptive activity ended in September 2018 .

Seismicity rates during the month were about 25% lower than last month.

Sulfur dioxide emission rates are low at the top and below the detection limits at PuʻuʻŌʻō and in the lower East Rift Zone.

The crater lake at the bottom of Halema'uma'u continues to expand and deepen slowly. As of June 3, the depth of the lake was approximately 36 meters. A certain amount of sulfur dioxide is dissolved in the summit lake and work is continuing to try to quantify this process.

Kilauea - Halema'uma'u crater on 05.29.2020 - The lake has an area of ​​around 25,000 square meters, which is more than double the area measured at the end of December - photo HVO

Kilauea - Halema'uma'u crater on 05.29.2020 - The lake has an area of ​​around 25,000 square meters, which is more than double the area measured at the end of December - photo HVO

Kilauea - Halema'uma'u crater on 29.05.2020 - The lake is warmer than the rocks which surround it and have fumaroles - Doc. HVO - One click to enlarge

Kilauea - Halema'uma'u crater on 29.05.2020 - The lake is warmer than the rocks which surround it and have fumaroles - Doc. HVO - One click to enlarge

Over the past month, summit inclinometers have shown a slight increase in inflationary tilt, consistent with an increase in the rate of magma entering the volcano's shallow storage system.

The gas measurements show continuous low levels of sulfur dioxide emissions from the Halema'uma'u region, which probably means that magma is not present a few hundred meters from the surface.

Further east, on the east rift zone of Kīlauea, GPS stations and inclinometers continue to show movements compatible with the filling of the magmatic reservoir of the east rift zone in the vast region between Puʻu ʻŌʻō and route 130 .

Although not currently erupting, areas of high and persistent ground temperatures and minor gas releases are still in the vicinity of the cracks in the lower rift zone east of 2018. These include vapor from water, very small amounts of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. These conditions should be present in the long term. Similar conditions after the 1955 eruption continued for years, if not decades.

Kilauea - This series of maps compares aerial images collected before the collapse of the Kīlauea summit in 2018 with aerial images collected after the collapse of the summit in 2018 - Doc. HVO - One click to enlarge

Kilauea - This series of maps compares aerial images collected before the collapse of the Kīlauea summit in 2018 with aerial images collected after the collapse of the summit in 2018 - Doc. HVO - One click to enlarge

For the record, an episode that is reminiscent of that of 2018 ...

The last global pandemic raged 100 years ago when Kilauea erupted. This eruption produced the Mauna Iki ("small mountain") lava shield in the southwest rift zone of Kīlauea, and coincided with fluctuations in the Halema'uma'u lava lake. It ended in early August 1920.

By the end of November 1919, the long-lived lava lake Halema'uma'u was at a high level and, in fact, frequently spilled over the main soil of the caldera. Suddenly, on November 28, it emptied completely without earthquakes, leaving an empty pit almost 200 meters deep.

 

Source: HVO

Asosan - photo RKK 05.06.2020 / 09h55

Asosan - photo RKK 05.06.2020 / 09h55

The eruption that occurred at Mount Aso on May 22 continues.

This June 5, an ash plume is observed between 500 and 900 meters (after 3 p.m.) above the Nakadake crater.

The activity is underway this June 6.

 

Sources: JMA & VAAC Tokyo

Manam - blue gas emission on 03.06.2020 / Sentinel-2 bands 12,11,4 - and thermal anomalies of the last days / Doc Mirova on 06.06.2020
Manam - blue gas emission on 03.06.2020 / Sentinel-2 bands 12,11,4 - and thermal anomalies of the last days / Doc Mirova on 06.06.2020

Manam - blue gas emission on 03.06.2020 / Sentinel-2 bands 12,11,4 - and thermal anomalies of the last days / Doc Mirova on 06.06.2020

The eruption started in Manam, Papua New Guinea, on June 29, 2014 continues with spaced episodes.

In June, the Sentinel-2 images reveal a covered summit, from which emitted bluish gas (sulfur dioxide) emissions on June 3, and Mirova reports thermal anomalies, moderate - 23 MW on June 4 - to low - 5 MW on June 6.

 

Sources: Sentinel-2 and Mirova

Popocatépetl - explosion of 04.06.2020 / 23h01 - WebcamsdeMexico

Popocatépetl - explosion of 04.06.2020 / 23h01 - WebcamsdeMexico

In the past 24 hours, the Popocatépetl volcano monitoring system has identified 344 exhalations accompanied by water vapor, volcanic gases and small amounts of ash. The ash emissions were scattered in the south, southwest sector.

Two moderate explosions were also detected yesterday at 11:00 p.m. and 11:02 p.m. local time.

In addition, 453 minutes of tremors were recorded.

During the night, continuous emissions of water vapor, gas and small amounts of ash were observed.

During the morning of June 5, there were volcanic gas emissions and small amounts of ash scattered to the southwest.

The volcanic alert remains at Amarillo Fase 2.

 

Source: Cenapred

 Popocatépetl - exhalation on 04.06.2020 / 12h29 - WebcamsdeMexico

Popocatépetl - exhalation on 04.06.2020 / 12h29 - WebcamsdeMexico

Popocatépetl - summary of activity over the past 24 hours - Doc. Cenapred

Popocatépetl - summary of activity over the past 24 hours - Doc. Cenapred

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