Overblog
Editer l'article Suivre ce blog Administration + Créer mon blog

Earth of fire

Actualité volcanique, Articles de fond sur étude de volcan, tectonique, récits et photos de voyage

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #volcanic activity
Mt Ruapehu Crater Lake (Te Wai ā-moe) -photo 04.05.2022 / GeoNet - one click to enlarge

Mt Ruapehu Crater Lake (Te Wai ā-moe) -photo 04.05.2022 / GeoNet - one click to enlarge

High levels of volcanic gas emissions and strong volcanic shaking continue at Mount Ruapehu. The volcano is still at a high level of unrest. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at 2, with a greater chance of an eruption over the next four weeks than at Volcanic Alert Level 1.

Last week, steam plumes were observed above the crater lake of Mount Ruapehu (Te Wai ā-moe). Observation flights confirmed that these steam plumes were not caused by an eruption. Instead, they were linked to a combination of increased heat flux at the crater lake and still cold atmospheric conditions. Over the past 12 days, Crater Lake's temperature has peaked at 41°C after a four-week stint of 36-38°C. Our modeling suggests that maintaining lake temperature and the recent rise required approximately 300 to 400 MW of thermal energy.

Since the beginning of March, we have been recording a strong volcanic tremor at Mount Ruapehu. This is the most sustained and vigorous volcanic tremor recorded in two decades, and it has accompanied the increase in temperature of the crater lake. Although tremor levels remain elevated, there has been a decrease in tremor over the past week.

The high production of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide, and the strong sustained volcanic tremor continue to indicate that molten rock (magma) is driving this time of heightened unrest. Crater Lake's temperature increase reflects the increasing upwelling of hot fluids and gases through active vents. Available laboratory analyzes of the latest fluid and gas samples from Crater Lake show elevated temperatures within the hydrothermal system but no reaction with magmatic material.

 

Source: Geonet

Ruapehu - Hazards map and advice in the event of an eruption, updated on 10.05.2022 - Doc. GNS - one click to enlarge

Ruapehu - Hazards map and advice in the event of an eruption, updated on 10.05.2022 - Doc. GNS - one click to enlarge

Elevated surface temperatures and sulfur dioxide emissions have been detected at Cleveland in satellite data for the past two days, representing a departure from background activity.

AVO raises the Aviation Color Code and Volcano Alert Level to YELLOW/ADVISORY.

Cleveland Volcano forms the western portion of Chuginadak Island, a remote and uninhabited island in the east-central Aleutians. The volcano is located approximately 45 miles (75 km) west of the community of Nikolski and 940 miles (1,500 km) southwest of Anchorage.

Cleveland Volcano is monitored with a limited real-time seismic network. This smaller network inhibits AVO's ability to detect precursor disorders that can lead to an explosive eruption. Early detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data. Cleaveland eruptions typically generate small volcanic ash clouds that pose a hazard in the immediate vicinity of the volcano, although larger ash emissions are possible.

 

Source: AVO

Cleveland - photo Mees, Burke / 03.06.2020 via AVO - one click to enlarge

Cleveland - photo Mees, Burke / 03.06.2020 via AVO - one click to enlarge

Between May 2 and May 8, 2022, normal Strombolian-type explosive activity was observed at Stromboli. The total hourly frequency of explosions fluctuated between low values ​​(4 events/h) and medium values ​​(10 events/h). The intensity of the explosions was low and medium in the area of ​​the North crater and low in the area of ​​the Center-South crater.

As part of the activities of the DPC/INGV Annex A convention and the UNO departmental project, 2 inspections were carried out in the summit area on May 5 and 7 in order to make findings using drones from the area. of the crater and characterize its morpho-structural arrangement. Through data analysis, a DSM (Digital Surface Model) was obtained of the crater area with a resolution of 45 cm and two orthomosaics with a resolution of 11 cm and 53 cm. During the inspection on May 5, the activity was mainly characterized by light explosions of black ash.

Stromboli - 3D view derived from a Sentinel-2 image of April 12, 2022 - Doc. Copernicus EU

Stromboli - 3D view derived from a Sentinel-2 image of April 12, 2022 - Doc. Copernicus EU

Stromboli - A) shaded terrain model of the crater area; B) Orthomosaic; C) Thermal orthomosaic; D) explosion of May 5, 2022 in sector CS1; E) explosion of May 5, 2022 in sector N1 - doc. INGV OE

Stromboli - A) shaded terrain model of the crater area; B) Orthomosaic; C) Thermal orthomosaic; D) explosion of May 5, 2022 in sector CS1; E) explosion of May 5, 2022 in sector N1 - doc. INGV OE

One of the most beautiful places in Iceland is for sale.

The area, which covers 315 hectares, encompasses Fjaðrárgljúfur, one of the country's most important natural pearls.

Fjaðrárgljúfur Canyon was formed 9,000 years ago, at the end of the Ice Age. The retreat of a glacier upstream gave birth to a glacial lake, due to the presence of a rock lock composed mainly of palagonite, dated 2 million years. The water level rose to overcome this lock, and the Fjaðrá river began its work of erosion, forming a winding canyon about two kilometers long and deep in places a hundred meters in the rocks and the palagonite.

Fjaðrárgljúfur has been managed by the Icelandic Environment Agency for the past few years. The agency closed the area for weeks in recent years when tourist traffic caused damage to fragile vegetation around the canyon.

Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon - NB: respect the limits of the trail - photo archives © Bernard Duyck 2015 - one click to enlarge

Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon - NB: respect the limits of the trail - photo archives © Bernard Duyck 2015 - one click to enlarge

According to information from Frétablaðið, the purchaser of the land is an Icelander who works for tourism. The newspaper's sources estimate the purchase price to be between 300 and 350 million ISK.(2.2-2.5 million euros)

The Icelandic State can intervene and buy the land thanks to a right of first refusal, but they have a limited time.
 

Until now, there were no admission fees (parking and entry fee) for visitors to the canyon.

 

Sources: Frétablaðið & Iceland Review

Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon - photo archives © Bernard Duyck 2015 - one click to enlarge
Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon - photo archives © Bernard Duyck 2015 - one click to enlarge

Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon - photo archives © Bernard Duyck 2015 - one click to enlarge

Commenter cet article

Archives

Articles récents

Hébergé par Overblog