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Earth of fire

Actualité volcanique, Articles de fond sur étude de volcan, tectonique, récits et photos de voyage

Articles avec #art on the way of fire catégorie

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Art on the way of fire

To fully understand Meredith Stoudenmire's works, you need to know a little about her background.

The artist, Meredith Stoudenmire


Born in Greenville in 1975, a city in South Carolina in the United States, where she still lives and works, she discovered volcanoes in a geology class at the University.

They have always fascinated her, although she branched out into the arts; She obtained a Bachelor of Fine Arts in printmaking, before moving into painting.

"The yellow river" -work by © Meredith Stoudenmire 2018 (in the background of the photo above)

"The yellow river" -work by © Meredith Stoudenmire 2018 (in the background of the photo above)

Her work remains symbolically inspired by volcanoes, and in his most recent series, by adventure and childish attraction to risk taking.

Although she has not hiked on all the illustrated volcanoes, she is documenting herself thanks to the photos found on the internet to feed her creative spirit.

Photos taken of his children have inspired several series of paintings.

Seeing her little girl hopping above crevasses filled with lava, in her series "Cracks are hot lava", we tremble for her safety and we hope that the adventure will end well for her.

Cracks are hot lava 7 - with Sylvia - Work of © Meredith Stoudenmire 2019

Cracks are hot lava 7 - with Sylvia - Work of © Meredith Stoudenmire 2019

She paints her little boy asleep on a raft on the "Yellow river", or canoeing on a river-volcano, and we sail with him towards danger.
 

Volcano River - Work of © Meredith Stoudenmire 2018. (Acrylic on canvas. 26 x 30 x 1 in.)

Volcano River - Work of © Meredith Stoudenmire 2018. (Acrylic on canvas. 26 x 30 x 1 in.)

She is currently working on a series of watercolors that will illustrate a book being written ... a volcano-dragon spits its ash plume while dragging its magmatic chamber, as if pulsed out of the ground, towards the lakes of Kelimutu, above the hot springs of Yellowstone, above Dallol or Crater Lake.

So many adventures in perspective !

Watercolors by © Meredith Stoudenmire 2020
Watercolors by © Meredith Stoudenmire 2020
Watercolors by © Meredith Stoudenmire 2020

Watercolors by © Meredith Stoudenmire 2020

Sources:

Thanks to Meredith for her correspondence, all the mark of her smile.


You can find it on:

- Volcano Answers - art by Meredith Stoudenmire - http://www.volcanoanswers.com/

- On his Facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/pg/Meredith-Stoudenmire-Art-925531421171931/posts/?ref=page_internal

- On Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/volcanoanswers/?hl=fr&fbclid=IwAR33I8LcV2Z0nhRRCz-6Dwy1TRhXqA5wcZ_4m1g_i0v3kDykmVr5yx2Jb38

 

Thanks also to Sylvain Chermette, 80 jours voyages, who introduced me to the artist.

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Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Art on the way of fire

Faced with the Covid-19 pandemic which is hitting Italy hard, the Neapolitan artist Gennaro Regina, one of whose favorite themes is Vesuvius, reacted in April 2020 by producing some "volcanic" works, which reveal as many artistic emotions than messages.

Corona virus vs Vesuvius - Work by Gennaro Regina (put on its Facebook page on 04.28.2020)

Corona virus vs Vesuvius - Work by Gennaro Regina (put on its Facebook page on 04.28.2020)

He put on his Facebook page less recent works related to the theme.

I am alive - Work by Gennaro Regina

I am alive - Work by Gennaro Regina

Creativity, spontaneity, improvisation, panache, explosiveness ... volcanic, all these qualifiers cannot define it. He will do it himself, saying:

                                                 " Sono figlio della pop art "

 

Born in 1965, into a family of publishers and booksellers of art books, he mixes painting and photography since the 80s.

He was influenced by the works of Andy Warhol and pop-art, a combination of graphic art, and advertising and artistic techniques, by Vesuvius and the Neapolitan traditions ... does he not bear the first name of a bishop famous for his interaction with the volcano?

His favorite themes are the Eruptions of Vesuvius, in all its colors, The Neapolitan landscapes, of Ischia, or Capri, and Homo Ludens, really very personal.

Vesuvius seen from the Bay of Naples - Work by Gennaro Regina / Picturesque Voyage Via Vittoria Colonna, 15b Napoli.

Vesuvius seen from the Bay of Naples - Work by Gennaro Regina / Picturesque Voyage Via Vittoria Colonna, 15b Napoli.

Sources:

- Artist's website - link

- Gennaro Regina's Facebook page - link

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Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Art on the way of fire


The Ortiz-Guardian Museum in León, Nicaragua, is the National Art Gallery. It occupies three large square pavilions covered with red tiles built in the eighteenth century, deploying Andalusian around interior gardens.

My friend Ced Nordman has just sent me pictures of Nicaraguan primitivist paintings, decorating one of the rooms, to illustrate the theme of "art and volcanoes".

Omotepe, the lake and its two volcanoes - by Julio Sequoia (oil / canvas 26 x 35 cm) - Centro de Arte Fundation Ortiz Guardian in Léon - photo Ced Nordman

Omotepe, the lake and its two volcanoes - by Julio Sequoia (oil / canvas 26 x 35 cm) - Centro de Arte Fundation Ortiz Guardian in Léon - photo Ced Nordman

Cerro Negro erupting 2009, during a procession - by Olga Maradiaga (acrylic / canvas 54 x 49 cm) - Centro de Arte Fundation Ortiz Guardian in Léon - photo Ced Nordman

Cerro Negro erupting 2009, during a procession - by Olga Maradiaga (acrylic / canvas 54 x 49 cm) - Centro de Arte Fundation Ortiz Guardian in Léon - photo Ced Nordman

Starting from the observation of their own immediate reality and not from foreign aesthetic theories, these paintings spontaneously express the exuberance of Nicaraguan landscapes, exploiting the color of their flora and fauna, in works of a workmanship that approaches guidelines of so-called naive art.
 

Al otro lado de la ciudad - by Alvaro Gaitan (oil / canvas 61 x 102 cm) - Centro de Arte Fundation Ortiz Guardian in Léon - photo Ced Nordman

Al otro lado de la ciudad - by Alvaro Gaitan (oil / canvas 61 x 102 cm) - Centro de Arte Fundation Ortiz Guardian in Léon - photo Ced Nordman

Masaya, popular festival - by Manuel Garcia Moia - Centro de Arte Fundation Ortiz Guardian in Léon - photo Ced Nordman

Masaya, popular festival - by Manuel Garcia Moia - Centro de Arte Fundation Ortiz Guardian in Léon - photo Ced Nordman

These works, marked by a sincerity of the look, have vibrant colors; the perspective and the proportions between the elements are not always respected. The paintings are spontaneous, reflecting the sensitivity of the painter, and a world, happy, festive, ideally perceived.

Arrival of the Spanish galleons, and the battles with the natives - artist not mentioned - Centro de Arte -Fundation Ortiz in Leon - photo Ced Nordman

Arrival of the Spanish galleons, and the battles with the natives - artist not mentioned - Centro de Arte -Fundation Ortiz in Leon - photo Ced Nordman

Centro de Arte Fundation Ortiz Guardian in Léon - photo Ced Nordman

Centro de Arte Fundation Ortiz Guardian in Léon - photo Ced Nordman

Santiago de los Caballeros de León (its full name in Spanish is little used) is located on the León River, about 80 km northwest of Managua, and about 17 km north of the coast of the Pacific Ocean. Although less populated than Managua, León has long been the intellectual center of the nation, with a university founded in 1813. León is also an important industrial and commercial center.

It was also in this city that in 1979 the last upheavals of a ruthless civil war that lasted three years took place. The square of the city’s very harmonious grand cathedral was the scene of bloody battles in 1979 between the troops of the dictator Somoza and the ultimately victorious forces of the Sandinista uprising.

 

Source:

Thanks to Ced for his information and sharing his photos, wishing him a good trip among the many volcanoes of Nicaragua.

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Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Art on the way of fire

Johan Christian Dahl, Norwegian landscaper, visiting Castellamarre di Stabia, is fortunate to witness an eruption of Vesuvius.

At the beginning of 1820, through an open fracture along the western slope of the large cone, a spectacular lava flow poured towards the Pass of the Savior. The painter visited the eruptive site several times, and made sketches of molten lava, with the Bay of Naples in the background; He also notices the powerlessness of the inhabitants in the face of sulfur gas emanations exhaled by the crevices. Subsequently, in his workshop, Dahl creates spectacular oils on canvas, such as "View of Vesuvius in eruption" (1821)

"View of Vesuvius in eruption" in 1920 - Oil on canvas work by J.C. Dahl (1921) - kept at the Städel Art Institute and municipal gallery

"View of Vesuvius in eruption" in 1920 - Oil on canvas work by J.C. Dahl (1921) - kept at the Städel Art Institute and municipal gallery

Der ausbruch des Vesuv im Dezember1820 / Öl auf Leinwand 128 x 172 cm / Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main

"Boats on the beach near Naples" depicts the bay magnified by the erupting volcano, and the life that goes on for fishermen.

Like the previous painting, several different versions were executed ... in this theme, we see various phases of the eruption on the basis of an almost similar setting.

"Boats on the beach near Naples" - by J.C. Dahl (1921) / version "1"

"Boats on the beach near Naples" - by J.C. Dahl (1921) / version "1"

"Boats on the beach near Naples" - by J.C. Dahl (1921) / version "2"

"Boats on the beach near Naples" - by J.C. Dahl (1921) / version "2"

Johan Christian Dahl, born February 24, 1788 in Bergen and died October 14, 1857 in Dresden, is a Norwegian landscape painter.

He comes from a simple background: his father is a modest fisherman from Bergen, Norway.

As a child, Dahl studied at Bergen Cathedral to become a priest, but his early artistic abilities led him to pursue a career in painting. From 1803 to 1809, he studied with the painter Johan Georg Müller, whose workshop was then the most important in Bergen. He began to paint for theater sets, tried his hand at portraiture and views of Bergen and its surroundings.

Dahl continued his studies at the Academy in Copenhagen, a city in which he painted the surrounding countryside.

Dahl participated in annual art exhibitions in Copenhagen from 1812, but his real breakthrough occurred in 1815, when he exhibited no less than thirteen paintings. Danish prince Christian Frederik ensures that his works are purchased for the royal collection; he also becomes a friend and a patron of the artist.
 

Portrait of Johan Christian Dahl by C. Vogel von Vogelstein

Prince Christian Frederik wrote to Dahl in 1820 from Italy to invite him to the Quisisana Palace in Castellammare di Stabia, located at the foot of the majestic Mont Faito. - The name of the place refers to "Stabia", deriving from the old Roman name, and to "Castellammare" designating the 9th century castle around which the city developed - Charmed by the place and the view of Vesuvius, Dahl takes a series of unusual views of great artistic quality, and has thus created charming landscapes of this lesser-known corner of the Gulf of Naples and our volcano.
The luck, for Dahl, wanted at the beginning of 1820, through an open fracture along the western slope of the great cone, a spectacular lava flow towards the Pass of the Savior. This stay becomes a decisive factor in his artistic development. It is in Italy, with its strong southern light, that Dahl's art truly reaches its peak.

The castle and the bay of Naples - Castellamarre di Stabio - photos VesuvuiliveThe castle and the bay of Naples - Castellamarre di Stabio - photos Vesuvuilive

The castle and the bay of Naples - Castellamarre di Stabio - photos Vesuvuilive

Sources:

- Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main

- Biography - Wikipedia.

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Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Art on the way of fire

Fascinated by the nature and power of the forces that govern the planet, and its hosts whose lives they condition, Joel Rea tries to account for these interactions in his paintings using metaphor and self-portrait.

Then born a dreamlike universe, magnified by a demanding technique and a realization of extreme finesse. His paintings are full of details, which defines him as a hyperrealist painter.

 

Hyperrealism is an art movement that appeared in the late sixties, of American origin, characterized by a representation of the environment, characters or everyday objects, whose meticulousness and illusionist precision exceeds imitation.

" Forces " - Joel Rea's artwork 2014 - one click to enlarge

" Forces " - Joel Rea's artwork 2014 - one click to enlarge

His painting "Forces" depicts with a photographic precision a plume of ashes during an eruption ... and leaves room for the dream, the reflection on the place of man in the face of the power of the volcano.

The character is slightly vaulted, absorbed by the ash that flows between the fingers ... your imagination will do the rest.

Have you ever let fine ash in your knuckles?

 

" Forces " - detail on the plume of ashes - work of Joel Rea

 

" Forces " - detail on the character - work of Joel Rea

" Forces " - detail on the character - work of Joel Rea

Joel Rea was born in Queensland, Australia in 1983. He graduated from the Queenqland College of Art in 2003.

He then exhibited in Australia and the United States, and received prestigious awards.

In 2013, he was selected for the Archibald Salon Des Refuses exhibition in Sydney, the Black Swan Award for Portraiture in Perth, the Fleurieu Landscape Award in Adelaide, and won the 2013 ANL Maritime Art Award in Melbourne.

This artist is a hard worker who can spend more than 700 hours on a single work

 

Sources:

Joel Rea official website - link

Artis a day - link
 

Joel Rea - NEW YORK - BEASTS OF ARCADIA at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, New York. www.joelrea.com.au

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Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Art on the way of fire, #Eruptions historiques, #Excursions and trips

In Akrotiri, at least one frescoed room has been found in every house. This characteristic is a testimony to the high standard of living of the inhabitants. They describe sports games or cultural scenes, or everyday life, with landscapes of Santorini or Egypt.

The execution is neat, the details are precise, the natural color spectrum extended. The paintings are started on a coating) wet lime, but finished on a dry support.

The pigments used are ocher and jarosite for yellow, ocher or hematite for red, and Egyptian blue. The contours are drawn in graphite. The colors are used in a united way, without gradients.

Akrotiri - frescoes of the House of the Ladies - Museum of Prehistory - photo © Bernard Duyck 09.2019

Akrotiri - frescoes of the House of the Ladies - Museum of Prehistory - photo © Bernard Duyck 09.2019

Akrotiri - frescoes of the Maison des Dames - detail about the clothes of a young woman, "the lady with Papyrus" - Museum of prehistory - - photo © Bernard Duyck 09.

Akrotiri - frescoes of the Maison des Dames - detail about the clothes of a young woman, "the lady with Papyrus" - Museum of prehistory - - photo © Bernard Duyck 09.

Akrotiri - frescoes of the House of the ladies - scene of offering to the mistress of house, or to the goddess - photo © Bernard Duyck 09.2019

Akrotiri - frescoes of the House of the ladies - scene of offering to the mistress of house, or to the goddess - photo © Bernard Duyck 09.2019

Frescoes found in the "House of the ladies" :

The storied house was named after the discovery of frescoes with female characters and papyrus, a motif borrowed from the Egyptian cult of the goddess Hathor.

Another fresco depicts the preparation of a ceremony by the mistress of the house; A lady wears heavy breasts, belonging, according to Marinatos, to a married matron.

These female figures, of different ages, represent a female feminine community of Akrotiri, during a ceremony of offerings to the goddess.

Women wear either a colorful skirt down to the ankles and a blouse with sleeves to the elbow, or a short-sleeved dress, low-cut well below the breasts. The clothes are woven and often adorned with bands.

Akrotiri - Xeste 3 - young girl, saffron picker in flowers - Doc. Marinatos

Akrotiri - Xeste 3 - young girl, saffron picker in flowers - Doc. Marinatos

Akrotiri - Xeste 3 - fresco of saffron pickers - Doc. Marinatos

Akrotiri - Xeste 3 - fresco of saffron pickers - Doc. Marinatos

 Akrotiri - Xeste 3 - fresco of the Mistress of animals - Doc. Marinatos

Akrotiri - Xeste 3 - fresco of the Mistress of animals - Doc. Marinatos

Frescoes of "Potnia Theron", the Mistress of animals and crocus collection in bloom.

Decorating a wall on the second floor of the house Xeste 3 / room 3, a girl, the skull partly shaved (gray head) leaving a few locks of long hair and festive clothes, picks crocus flowers on a hill.

This collection shows a significant economic activity, and the trade of saffron. This fresco represents the human level of society ... the divine level is depicted in another part of the floor, with the offering of the pistils to the great goddess, sitting on a podium and holding a winged griffin on a leash. A monkey offers him a handful of crocus, while a girl prepares another basket with flowers. No direct contact between humans and the goddess. We find monkey and griffin on murals of Knossos.

This house is considered a place of initiation and rites of passage, because of the layout of the place and the various frescoes.

Akrotiri - fresco of the blue monkeys - Museum of Prehistory - photo © Bernard Duyck 09.2019
Akrotiri - fresco of the blue monkeys - Museum of Prehistory - photo © Bernard Duyck 09.2019

Akrotiri - fresco of the blue monkeys - Museum of Prehistory - photo © Bernard Duyck 09.2019

Fresco of the room of the blue monkeys (room B6)

The theme of the fresco, which decorates the Beta room, is the celebration of nature.

In a landscape depicting the nature of Thêra -  water in the bottom, rocks, and trees - the monkeys are represented in a composition, in various poses, with an impression of movement corresponding to their natural attitude, suggesting that the painter was able to observe directly these monkeys, imported from the eastern Mediterranean.

In Knossos we find a similar fresco, proof that both islands were occupied by men and women of the Minoan civilization.

 

Sources:

- Akrotiri - Thera and the Mediterranean - by Nanno Marinatos / Edit. Militos

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Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Art on the way of fire

On February 18, 1963, residents near Agung heard loud explosions and saw clouds above the crater of the volcano. On 24 February, lava flows are issued on the northern slope and reach seven kilometers in the next 20 days. On March 17, the volcano produced explosions (of volcanic explosive index 5) by sending debris between eight and ten kilometers in the air. Pyroclastic flows devastate many villages, killing about 1,500 people. Lahars, produced by heavy rainfall, kill an additional 200 people. A second explosion, May 16, generates new pyroclastic flows that kill another 200 inhabitants. Lava flows pass a few dozen meters from the temple of Besakih. The rescue of the temple is considered by the Balinese people as miraculous and as a signal of the gods who wanted to show their power, but without destroying the monument that the Balinese faithful had erected.

Agung 1963 - Procession of welcome and offerings of the Balinese - painting by Elang Erlangga 2019 - one click to enlarge.

Agung 1963 - Procession of welcome and offerings of the Balinese - painting by Elang Erlangga 2019 - one click to enlarge.

This painting was made by Elang Erlangga in 2019 to commemorate these historic events that occurred on the island of Bali in 1963. Specifically for this painting, acrylic paint was mixed with volcanic ash obtained by crushing bombs crust Agung's 1963 Eruption Bread until a smooth paste is produced.

As he tells it:
" The eruption of Mount Agung, which lasted nearly a month, peaked, with the first eruption of this climax beginning around 4 am and continuing continuously until about midday. The eruption produced a plume of ash nearly 23 km high, covered with lightning.
Thick clouds cover the east and southeast of the mountain. The wind blows from the southeast, carrying volcanic ash to the west and northwest. The ashes were also transported to Jakarta and Bandung, about 1,000 km away. My grandfather who was in Jakarta at that time found a layer of white dust covering the leaves and the car the next day. Pyroclastic flows have crossed the river valleys of the south and north slopes at an average speed of 60 km / h. That morning, at sunrise, the villages of Sorgre, Badeg, Sebudi, Lebih, Pura, Yeha, in the Strait, were covered by the burning clouds, killing about 1,000 people.
Around 18:30 that morning, the "rolling smoke" was approaching. The tip of the hot cloud made a slow, hissing sound, while pushing the debris out of the house and burning logs. The smell of sulfur was very strong. It was at this moment that the sound of gamelan Baleganjur was heard. The village chief, the elders, followed by a number of inhabitants seen carrying offerings, will form a welcome procession. Without hesitation, they prayed in front of the burning clouds, convinced that Ida Bathara, resident at Giri Tohlangkir, then went to welcome the inhabitants. It is this conviction that made the welcome procession take place in several villages and caused casualties in villages closer to the crater. According to the testimony of Anna Mathews in her book "The Night of Purnama" of 1965, while the host procession was held, the flow stopped in front of them. The southeast wind also flushes smoke from the village. All the inhabitants of Iseh have survived.
"

Agung - plume of the eruption in May 1963 - photo D.Mathews

Agung - plume of the eruption in May 1963 - photo D.Mathews

Eruption of Agung in 1963 - destruction in a village surrounding the volcano - photo 26.03.1963 AP

Eruption of Agung in 1963 - destruction in a village surrounding the volcano - photo 26.03.1963 AP

Following this deadly eruption of 1963, the Agung erupted again in 2017-2019 after a 54-year rest period.

Source: Elang Erlangga and archive footage

Agung - Galungan - the fervor of the Balinese against the unpredictable volcano - photo Sutopo Purwo Nugroho / BNPB 02.11.2017

Agung - Galungan - the fervor of the Balinese against the unpredictable volcano - photo Sutopo Purwo Nugroho / BNPB 02.11.2017

Agung - eruption with a double plume 26.11.2017 - Doc.Reuters

Agung - eruption with a double plume 26.11.2017 - Doc.Reuters

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Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Art on the way of fire

At Pompeii, at the feet of Vesuvius, discoveries succeed one another. After the graffiti specifying the month of the eruption that buried the city, a fresco was unveiled revealing the loves of Zeus and Leda.

Pompeii - the myth of Leda and the swan depicted on a newly discovered fresco - photo © AGF / SIPA

Pompeii - the myth of Leda and the swan depicted on a newly discovered fresco - photo © AGF / SIPA

This beautifully preserved illustration of the Greek myth was found in the bedroom of a Pompeian house, located in Via del Vesuvio, north of the city buried in 79 BC. This theme develops narratives about the relationship between the supreme god and humans, a complex mythology resumed by the syncretism practiced in Rome.

The fresco of Pompeii depicts the loves of the queen of Sparta Leda with Zeus who took the form of a swan. - photo Cesare Abatte / Archaeological Park of Pompeii

The fresco of Pompeii depicts the loves of the queen of Sparta Leda with Zeus who took the form of a swan. - photo Cesare Abatte / Archaeological Park of Pompeii

The myth and its implications in ancient history:

Zeus saw Leda, the wife of the king of Sparta, Tyndare, swimming in the river Euratos, and desired it.

To approach it, he discovered a ruse with the complicity of Aphrodite: he asked him to change into an eagle, and to simulate a pursuit, after having turned it into a swan. Leda took the frightened swan in his arms, and Zeus took the opportunity to unite with the queen.

Leda was fertilized by her husband the same day.

Leda gave birth to four children, two immortals, children of Zeus: Helen and Pollux, and two mortals, children of Tyndare: Clytemnestra and Castor.

Castor and Pollux, the Dioscuri - antique painted vase - Doc Master the stars

Castor and Pollux, the Dioscuri - antique painted vase - Doc Master the stars

The two boys, Castor and Pollux, known as Dioscuri (identified in the constellation Gemini, the Dioscuri are the patrons of sailors and athletes.), will know a human epic, followed by a divinity shared. Inseparable, they will be venerated by the Greeks then the Romans.

Menelaus intends to kill Helen but, struck by his beauty, he drops his sword. A flying Eros and Aphrodite, to Helene's left, look at the scene. Detail of an Attic crater with red figures, 450-440 BC J.-C., discovered in Gnathia (current Egnazia, Italy). - Louvre Museum

Menelaus intends to kill Helen but, struck by his beauty, he drops his sword. A flying Eros and Aphrodite, to Helene's left, look at the scene. Detail of an Attic crater with red figures, 450-440 BC J.-C., discovered in Gnathia (current Egnazia, Italy). - Louvre Museum

Helen, in her turn, became queen of Sparta, married to Menelaus, whom she relinquished, willingly or under duress, to marry prince Paris of Troy.

This episode triggered the Trojan War, which pitted a Greek coalition against the Trojans. The city finally falls after a long siege, thanks to a ploy: the Trojan horse that hid valiant warriors. All the protagonists of this story are taken up in the story of the Iliad.

The other girl, Clytemnestra, married the elder brother of Menelaus, Agamemnon, king of Mycenae and Greeks.

Clytemnestra had her husband murdered by her lover, Egysthe, on her return from the Trojan War. Oreste, their son, avenged his father by killing his mother.

 

How many fatalities have been gathered together, the mythological heroes and the city buried under the eruption.

 

Sources:

- France Culture - In Pompeii, discoveries in cascade

- You tube - Nuove scoperte in Pompei: the affresco di Leda e il cigno

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Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Art on the way of fire

These works by Alfredo Zalce Torres represent the eruption of Paricutin, near Michoacán.
 

The first painting was repatriated from the United States to Mexico.

Active from 1943 to 1952, Paricutin, located in the Michoacán-Guanajuato volcanic field, is the only volcano followed from birth to extinction.

El Paricutín, 1949 - oil on canvas by Alfredo Zalce - 70 x 103 cm. / MutualArt - one click to enlarge

El Paricutín, 1949 - oil on canvas by Alfredo Zalce - 70 x 103 cm. / MutualArt - one click to enlarge

Zalce, born in Michoacan, sympathized with people fleeing their villages as lava covered their homes and businesses and ashes polluted their water supply. The eruption was accompanied by small earthquakes in which many kneeled, fearing their near end.

In the left foreground, we can see three of the greatest artists of Mexico; Diego Rivera, Raul Anguiano and Gerardo Murillo aka Dr. Atl, whom he painted offering their paintings to tourists. Zalce caricatured them, although they were all his friends, expressing his excitement at seeing this tragedy used for commercial purposes.

El Paricutín, 1949 - oil on canvas by Alfredo Zalce, detail on the caricature of Dr. Atl

In the middle, the description of the distress of Mexicans fleeing the disaster ... and in the background, the cone of Paricutin and its lava flows.

This hierarchy in three planes corresponds to his resentments of witness, and native of the region.

 

Another painting by Zalce features a dark gray color palette for this "Paricutin" from 1949, too, in contrast to Dr. Atl's dynamic colors.

Paricutín, 1949 - Oil On Canvas by Alfredo Zalce - 54 of 79 cm

Paricutín, 1949 - Oil On Canvas by Alfredo Zalce - 54 of 79 cm

Born in Pátzcuaro (Michoacán) in 1908 of professional photographers parents , Alfredo Zalce lived in Tacubaya during the Mexican Revolution. His school was near the scene of the battle between the rival forces of Victoriano Huerta and Emiliano Zapata.

The young Alfredo would have started drawing at the age of six or seven. In elementary school, he drew regularly on the board to accompany his teachers and illustrate their lessons, to encourage his classmates.

Between 1924 and 1927, he studied at the Escuela Nacional de Artes Plásticas in Mexico City, where his formative influences included Mateo Saldaña, Germán Gedovius and Diego Rivera and other muralists. He had friendly relations with Diego Rivera and Rufino Tamayo, David Siqueiros, Jose Clemente Orozco and Frida Kahlo. As the eldest of three children, he assumed responsibility for the family after his father's death. while he was a student, he studied in the morning and worked in the afternoons to provide financial support.

Photos of Alfredo Zalce by Manuel Alvarez Bravo

Photos of Alfredo Zalce by Manuel Alvarez Bravo

Most of his career was devoted to teaching and cultural activities, and he founded many schools of paintings. He organized his first public exhibition at the José Guadalupe Posada Gallery in Mexico City in 1932.

Between 1937 and 1950, Zalce painted four murals on the school walls of the states of Colima, Puebla, Michoacán and Mexico City. In 1945, he completed one of his most famous works, the Estampas portfolio of Yucatan, after spending four months in southern Mexico. In 1948, he organized a major exhibition at the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes, which was then presented in his home state, Michoacán, at the Museo Michoacano in Morelia.

 "Gente y paisaje de Michoacán", mural by Alfredo Zalce / 1962 - Palacio de Gobierno by Michoacán Morelia, Michoacán, México. - photo Veo Kenxiz

 "Gente y paisaje de Michoacán", mural by Alfredo Zalce / 1962 - Palacio de Gobierno by Michoacán Morelia, Michoacán, México. - photo Veo Kenxiz

In 1950 he became director of the Bellas Artes de Morelia Popular School (sponsored by the University of Michoacán) and the Escuela de Pintura y Artesanias de Morelia (sponsored by the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes). He worked mainly in Morelia from that date. In the 1950s, he filled important commissions, including the Chamber of Deputies of the State of Michoacán and Morelia City Hall.

His works have also been exhibited outside of Mexico and now appear in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Moderna Museet in Stockholm, the National Museum in Warsaw, the National Art Gallery in Sofia . and in Mexico City.

When he died at the age of 95 in 2003, he was cremated at Panteón Jardínes del Tiempo in Morelia. His old house in the city was turned into Alfredo Zalce Foundation to preserve his legacy.

Sources:

- RO gallery - Alfredo Zalce, Mexican (1908 - 2003) biography

- Global Volcanoes Program - Michoacan-Guanajuato volcanic field - link

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Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Art on the way of fire

I recently took out a small canvas purchased in Bali, returning from the classic night excursion to the top of the Batur, to see the sunrise over the Agung and Rinjani.

An old man, a little hunched, sold it to me for a few Indonesian rupees.

Batur - painting on canvas (14 x 17 cm) - unknown artist - photo © Bernard Duyck

Batur - painting on canvas (14 x 17 cm) - unknown artist - photo © Bernard Duyck

Relevant to Naive Art, a non-academic movement and without proper definition, it is nevertheless characterized by traits common to these figurative representations: the subject, "rustic", illustrating landscapes and flowers, the non-respect, voluntary or not, of the rules of the Western perspective, the vivid colors without attenuation in the background, its details meticulous and awkward at the same time.

The description of the three craters of the Batur aligned on a fissure, the lake in the caldera, and its banks drawn by the volcano flows, is precise enough to identify with certainty the site.

 The 3 craters of the Batur - photo of the day 30.10.2017 / Ivana Dorn

The 3 craters of the Batur - photo of the day 30.10.2017 / Ivana Dorn

Batur - painting on canvas (14 x 17 cm), detail - unknown artist - photo © Bernard Duyck

Batur - painting on canvas (14 x 17 cm), detail - unknown artist - photo © Bernard Duyck

Batur - the lava field of the eruption 1968 eruption (Batur III, VEI 2) - photo Martin Moxter

Batur - the lava field of the eruption 1968 eruption (Batur III, VEI 2) - photo Martin Moxter

The Batur, historically active, is located in the center of two concentric caldeiras, northwest of the volcano Agung.

The outer 10 x 13.5 km caldera was formed during the eruption of the Ubud Ignimbrite, approximately 29,300 years ago, and now contains a caldera lake on the southeast side facing the Gunung satellite cone. Abang, the highest point of the complex.

The inner caldera, 6.4 x 9.4 km wide, was formed about 20 to 150 years ago during the Gunungkawi Ignimbrite eruption. The south-east wall of the inner caldera is under Lake Batur; The Batur cone was built in the internal caldera at a height higher than the edge of the outer caldera.

The Batur stratovolcano produced vents over much of its inner caldera, but a NE-SW crack system supports the Batur I, II, and III craters along the summit ridge. Historical eruptions have been characterized by mild to moderate explosive activity, sometimes accompanied by lava emission. Basaltic lava flows from the summit and flank mouths reached the caldera soil and the shores of Lake Batur in a historic period.

The last eruption is dated March 1999 to June 2000 (GVP)

Batur - a plume of ashes during the eruption of 1999-2000 - photo © Pascal Blondé on 01.11.1999

Batur - a plume of ashes during the eruption of 1999-2000 - photo © Pascal Blondé on 01.11.1999

Sources:

- Global Volcanism Program - Batur

- Website of Pascal Blondé - link

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