Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog

Earth of fire

Actualité volcanique, Articles de fond sur étude de volcan, tectonique, récits et photos de voyage

Articles avec #eruptions historiques catégorie

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Actualités volcaniques, #Eruptions historiques

Dr. Cohen of the University of Glasgow studied the recordings, done in the 1970s, of an Aboriginal ancestor of the Gugu Badhun people in Australia, recounting an event resembling a volcanic eruption.
The elder described "a time when a pit was made in the ground with lots of dust in the air, and that people got lost in the dust and died". He also described "an occurrence when the earth was on fire along the watercourses".
This story, transmitted according to oral tradition for about 230 generations, is a plausible description of a volcanic eruption.

Map of the Undara volcanic zone - Kinrara - Doc. Savannah Way / everythingbuttortoises.wordpress.com

Map of the Undara volcanic zone - Kinrara - Doc. Savannah Way / everythingbuttortoises.wordpress.com

A team of members from various universities examined rock samples of lava flows from the Kinrara volcano in Queensland (18.3 ° S - 144.6 ° E) using the Argon-argon technique. Thanks to these analyzes, an eruption of this volcano could be dated 7,000 +/- 2,000 years.


The Kinrara volcano has a deep crater 60 meters wide and 300m wide, which produced lava fountains and ashes; The lava flows of the volcano was 55 km long. following the valleys and course of the Burdekin River, a phenomenon resembling "the burning earth", recounted in the traditional native narratives.

The deposits that make the Kinrara cone indicate fountaining eruptions and the gentle effusion of lava. This photo shows geologists looking at horizontal layers of lava that probably formed when a lava lake occupied or overflowed the crater. The youngest layer (on top) drapes over the rim of the crater and formed when lava drained to a deeper level. Photograph by Steve Mattox / Oregonstate

The deposits that make the Kinrara cone indicate fountaining eruptions and the gentle effusion of lava. This photo shows geologists looking at horizontal layers of lava that probably formed when a lava lake occupied or overflowed the crater. The youngest layer (on top) drapes over the rim of the crater and formed when lava drained to a deeper level. Photograph by Steve Mattox / Oregonstate

The Kinrara is part of the McBride volcanic province. It is only responsible for an eruption among more than 400 eruptions that have marked this part of Australia over the past 9 million years. The Kinrara is known as the youngest volcano in this region.
The study of the Kinrara eruption is an important step in understanding the most recent volcanic activity in Australia, as well as the history and traditions of Aboriginal peoples. Dr. Cohen, hopes to continue this work on volcanism.
 
Sources:
- University of Glasgow - Australian volcanic eruption may have lived on in Aboriginal stories - link

- Quaternary Geochronology. - Holocene-Neogene volcanism in northeastern Australia: Chronology and eruption history.
- Morphology and geochemistry of the Kinrara volcano and lava field: a review of a holocene volcanic feature in the McBride lava province, North Queensland - David Stanton

Volcanism of Queensland / Australia: the lava fields are located by the crosses, the central volcanoes by round points. - Doc. Oregonstate Univ.

Volcanism of Queensland / Australia: the lava fields are located by the crosses, the central volcanoes by round points. - Doc. Oregonstate Univ.

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Eruptions historiques

Seventy years ago began the largest volcanic eruption in Iceland in the 20th century ... on March 29, 1947, at 6:41 am, the Hekla erupted after a period of sleep of 102 years.

The eruption of the Hekla in 1947 - Photo Sveinbjörn Þórhallsson.

The eruption of the Hekla in 1947 - Photo Sveinbjörn Þórhallsson.

After earthquakes, the eruption begins in an enormous roar. A crack length of 4 km. has opened; The first phase is Plinian and the eruptive plume quickly reaches the height of 30,000 meters. Around 7:10 the first pumices fall on Fljotshlid and the tephra and ash form a thick layer of 3 to 10 cm. Between the Vatnafjöll and the Hekla, the layer of tephra reaches a meter, dotted with bombs of large diameter. Two days after the onset of the eruption, the ashes return to Helsinki in Finland.
About 3.500 m³ of lava are produced per second during the first 20 hours ; lavas cover more than 12 km². Glacial melting will cause flooding in the Ytri-Ranga River.

 The eruption of the Hekla in 1947 - Doc. Oregonstate Univ.

The eruption of the Hekla in 1947 - Doc. Oregonstate Univ.

On the second day of the eruption, eight distinct eruptive columns are visible. At the lower end of the crack opens a crater named Hraungigur (the lava crater) from which emanates a constant flow of lava. Another crater of explosion forms on the southwest flank, called Axlargigur (the crater of the shoulder).
The eruption will last just in mid-April of the following year, the area covered by the lavas reaching 40 km², with a maximum lava flow's thickness of 100-meter .

The one of the Morgunblaðið newspapers of 30 April 1947 relates the eruption of Hekla, one of the most important events of the 20th century in Iceland - Iceland Monitor

The one of the Morgunblaðið newspapers of 30 April 1947 relates the eruption of Hekla, one of the most important events of the 20th century in Iceland - Iceland Monitor

This eruption was the first in Iceland to be photographed, filmed and commented in real time by the media. A reporter from Morgunblaðið described it as follows:
"The pillars of fire at the top of the mountain stretch 800 meters into the air and throw incandescent rocks of enormous size.These large rocks ascend with magic power before descending into the ocean of fire {...} Half an hour after a violent earthquake, the Hekla is surrounded by a thick volcanic cloud, from its base to the sky. Flashes of fire are regularly observed through thick smoke, and in the farms near Hekla, people hear thunderous noises, and doors and windows are shaking. "
Before the era of photography, the eruptions had been recounted by documents drawn, evoking for Hekla the "gates of Hell".

 Eruption of the Hekla / Olaus Magnus - Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus, book 2 - found in the Lars Henriksson's clipart collection - 1555

Eruption of the Hekla / Olaus Magnus - Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus, book 2 - found in the Lars Henriksson's clipart collection - 1555

The Erupting Hekla - detail of the Abraham Ortelius map / 1585 - The Latin text translation: "Hekla, perpetually condemned to storms and snow, vomits rocks in a terrible noise"

The Erupting Hekla - detail of the Abraham Ortelius map / 1585 - The Latin text translation: "Hekla, perpetually condemned to storms and snow, vomits rocks in a terrible noise"

Since the historic eruption of 1947-48, Hekla has known many others ... the last one dates back to February-March 2000.
 
Sources:
- Global volcanism Program - Hekla - link
- Iceland Monitor - Unique photo of Hekla eruption for the first time - link
- Iceland Review - 70th Anniversary of 1947 Hekla Eruption - link

Hekla - lava flows from 1947 to the present day - map Sigrún Hreinsdóttir in GVP

Hekla - lava flows from 1947 to the present day - map Sigrún Hreinsdóttir in GVP

An eruption of the Hekla dominated by an aurora borealis - photo Sigurdur H. Stefnisson

An eruption of the Hekla dominated by an aurora borealis - photo Sigurdur H. Stefnisson

Eruption of the Hekla in 2000 - the aircraft on the left gives the scale - photo RAX / Iceland Monitor

Eruption of the Hekla in 2000 - the aircraft on the left gives the scale - photo RAX / Iceland Monitor

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Eruptions historiques

Il y a septante ans débutait la plus grande éruption volcanique en Islande au 20° siècle ... le 29 mars 1947, à 6h41, l'Hekla est entré en éruption après une période de sommeil de 102 ans.

L'éruption de l'Hekla en 1947 -  Photo Sveinbjörn Þórhallsson.

L'éruption de l'Hekla en 1947 - Photo Sveinbjörn Þórhallsson.

Après des séismes, l'éruption débute dans un énorme grondement. Une fissure longue de 4 km. s'est ouverte ; la première phase est plinienne et le panache éruptif atteint rapidement la hauteur de 30.000 mètres. Vers 7h10 les premières ponces tombent sur Fljotshlid et les téphra et cendres y forment une couche épaisse de 3 à 10 cm. Entre le Vatnafjöll et l'Hekla, la couche de téphra atteint un mètre , parsemée de bombes de diamètre important. Deux jours après le début de l'éruption les cendres retombent sur Helsinki en Finlande.

Environ 3.500 m³ de lave sont produits par seconde au cours des 20 premières heures : les laves recouvrent plus de 12 km². La fonte glaciaire va causé une inondation dans la rivière Ytri-Ranga.

L'éruption de l'Hekla en 1947 - Doc. Oregonstate Univ.

L'éruption de l'Hekla en 1947 - Doc. Oregonstate Univ.

Le second jour de l'éruption, huit colonnes éruptives distinctes sont visibles. A l'extrémité basse de la fissure s'ouvre un cratère nommé Hraungigur (le cratère de lave) d'où émane un flux constant de lave. Un autre cratère d'explosion se forme sur le flanc sud-ouest, appelé Axlargigur (le cratère de l'épaulement).

L'éruption va durer juste mi-avril de l'année suivante, la superficie recouverte par les laves atteignant les 40 km², avec une épaisseur maximum de la coulée de 100 mètres.

La une du journal Morgunblaðið du 30 Avril 1947 relate l'éruption de l'Hekla, un des évènement les plus important du 20° siècle en Islande – doc.Iceland Monitor

La une du journal Morgunblaðið du 30 Avril 1947 relate l'éruption de l'Hekla, un des évènement les plus important du 20° siècle en Islande – doc.Iceland Monitor

Cette éruption a été la première en Islande a être photographiée, filmée et commentée en temps réel par les médias. Un journaliste de Morgunblaðið l'a décrit ainsi :

"Les piliers de feu au sommet de la montagne s'étirent sur 800 mètres dans l'air. Ils lancent des roches incandescentes, d'une taille énorme.Ces grandes roches remontent avec une puissance magique avant de redescendre dans l'océan du feu {...} Une demi-heure après un violent séisme, l'Hekla est entouré d'un épais nuage volcanique, depuis sa base jusqu'au ciel. Des flashes de feu sont observés régulièrement à travers une fumée épaisse, et dans les fermes près de l'Hekla, les gens entendent de bruits de tonnerre, et les portes et les fenêtres es bâtiments tremblent. "

Avant l'ère de la photographie, les éruptions avaient été relatées par des documentsdessinés, évoquant pour l'Hekla les " portes de l'Enfer ".

Eruption de l'Hekla / Olaus Magnus - Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus, book 2 - retrouvé dans la collection Lars Henriksson's clipart  - 1555

Eruption de l'Hekla / Olaus Magnus - Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus, book 2 - retrouvé dans la collection Lars Henriksson's clipart - 1555

L'Hekla en éruption - détail de la carte d'Abraham Ortelius / 1585 - La traduction du texte latin : " l'Hekla, perpétuellement condamné aux tempêtes et à la neige, vomit des roches dans un bruit terrible"

L'Hekla en éruption - détail de la carte d'Abraham Ortelius / 1585 - La traduction du texte latin : " l'Hekla, perpétuellement condamné aux tempêtes et à la neige, vomit des roches dans un bruit terrible"

Depuis l'éruption historique de 1947-48, l'Hekla en a connu bien d'autres ... la dernière remonte à février-mars 2000.

 

Sources :

- Global volcanism Program – Hekla – link

- Iceland Monitor - Unique photo of Hekla eruption published for the first time – link

- Iceland Review - 70th Anniversary of 1947 Hekla Eruption – link

Hekla - les coulées de lave de 1947 à nos jours  - carte Sigrún Hreinsdóttir in GVP

Hekla - les coulées de lave de 1947 à nos jours - carte Sigrún Hreinsdóttir in GVP

Une éruption de l'Hekla dominée par une aurore boréale - photo Sigurdur H. Stefnisson

Une éruption de l'Hekla dominée par une aurore boréale - photo Sigurdur H. Stefnisson

Eruption de l'Hekla en 2000 - l'avion à gauche donne l'échelle  - photo RAX / Iceland Monitor

Eruption de l'Hekla en 2000 - l'avion à gauche donne l'échelle - photo RAX / Iceland Monitor

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Eruptions historiques
Ngorongoro Conservation Area. - Ngorongoro crater - photo William Warby / London, England

Ngorongoro Conservation Area. - Ngorongoro crater - photo William Warby / London, England

There 3.66 million years ago, proto-humans marched in wet volcanic ash at Laetoli in Tanzania, in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area.
When the nearby volcano erupted again, successive layers of ashes covered their footprints, considered to be the oldest known, and preserved them.

Geographical location and site plan of Laetoli - doc.elifesciences.org

Geographical location and site plan of Laetoli - doc.elifesciences.org

Laetoli footprints on the terrain and molding - doc. Smithsonian and elifesciences
Laetoli footprints on the terrain and molding - doc. Smithsonian and elifesciences

Laetoli footprints on the terrain and molding - doc. Smithsonian and elifesciences

A team of paleontologists led by Mary Leakey found footprints of animals cemented in volcanic ash in 1976, and in 1978 found a path 27 meters long, including about 70 human footprints.
These fingerprints were attributed to the Australopithecus afarensis, a fossil exemplar of which was found in the same layer of sediment.
The first humans who left these footprints were bipeds and had the big toes in line with the rest of their foot. This means that these first human feet were more human-like than ape-like, because the monkeys have very divergent big toes that help them climb and grab the materials as do the thumbs. The footprints also show that the gait of these first humans was "heel-strike"   (The heel of the foot strikes first) f
ollowed by "toe-off" (the toes push at the end of the stride), the way of modern humans walk.

The largest and smallest hominid fossils by species between 1 and 4 Ma - one click to enlarge - doc. Marco-Cherin / Nature

The largest and smallest hominid fossils by species between 1 and 4 Ma - one click to enlarge - doc. Marco-Cherin / Nature

Australopithecus afarensis - reconstruction of A. afarensis by John Gurche. (Photo Chip Clark)

Australopithecus afarensis - reconstruction of A. afarensis by John Gurche. (Photo Chip Clark)

Volcanoes have preserved the traces of Australopithecus afarensis, and confirmed their presence in the East African rift from Ethiopia to Tanzania, as well as variations in size and morphology (including sexual dimorphism)... and allowed to add one more milestone to the history of man.
 
Sources:
- Smithsonian - Laetoli Footprint Trails - link
- New footprints from Laetoli (Tanzania) - Fidelis T Masao & al - link
- Lallyouneedisbiology.wordpress.com - Lucy in the ground with diamonds.

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Eruptions historiques
aire de conservation du Ngorongoro - le cratère du Ngorongoro - photo  William Warby / London, England

aire de conservation du Ngorongoro - le cratère du Ngorongoro - photo William Warby / London, England

Il y a 3,66 millions d'années, des proto-humains marchaient dans la cendre volcanique humide à Laetoli en Tanzanie, dans l'aire de conservation du Ngorongoro.

Lorsque le volcan proche est de nouveau entré en éruption, des couches successives de cendres ont recouvert leurs empreintes, considérées comme les plus anciennes connues, et les ont préservées.

Localisation géographique et plan du site de Laetoli - doc.elifesciences.org

Localisation géographique et plan du site de Laetoli - doc.elifesciences.org

Empreintes de pas de Laetoli sur le terrain et moulage - doc. Smithsonian et elifesciences
Empreintes de pas de Laetoli sur le terrain et moulage - doc. Smithsonian et elifesciences

Empreintes de pas de Laetoli sur le terrain et moulage - doc. Smithsonian et elifesciences

Une équipe de paléontologues dirigée par Mary Leakey a retrouvé des empreintes d'animaux cimentées dans la cendre volcanique en 1976, puis en 1978, ils ont trouvés un cheminement long de 27 mètres, et incluant environ 70 empreintes humaines.

Ces empreintes ont été attribuée à l'Australopithecus afarensis, dont un exemplaire fossile fut retrouvé dans la même couche de sédiment.

Les premiers humains qui ont laissé ces empreintes étaient bipèdes et avaient les gros orteils en ligne avec le reste de leur pied. Cela signifie que ces premiers pieds humains étaient plus humains que les singes, car les singes ont des gros orteils très divergents qui les aident à grimper et à saisir les matériaux comme le font les pouces. Les empreintes montrent également que la démarche de ces premiers humains était «heel-strike» (le talon du pied frappe en premier) suivi de «toe-off» (les orteils poussent au bout de la foulée), la façon dont marchent les humains modernes.

Les plus grands et les plus petits fossiles d'hominidés par espèces entre 1 et 4 Ma - un clic pour agrandir - doc. Marco-Cherin / Nature

Les plus grands et les plus petits fossiles d'hominidés par espèces entre 1 et 4 Ma - un clic pour agrandir - doc. Marco-Cherin / Nature

Australopithecus afarensis - reconstruction d' A. afarensis par John Gurche. (Photo Chip Clark)

Australopithecus afarensis - reconstruction d' A. afarensis par John Gurche. (Photo Chip Clark)

Les volcans ont ainsi préservé les traces de l'Australopithecus afarensis , et confirmé sa présence dans la rift est-africain depuis l'Ethiopie actuelle jusqu'en Tanzanie, ainsi que les variations en taille et morphologie (dont le dimorphisme sexuel) ... et permis d'ajouter un jalon de plus à l'histoire de l'homme.

 

Sources :

- Smithsonian - Laetoli Footprint Trails - link 

- New footprints from Laetoli (Tanzania) provide evidence for marked body size variation in early hominins - Fidelis T Masao & al - link  

    - Lallyouneedisbiology.wordpress.com – Lucy in the ground with diamonds.

    Lire la suite

    Publié le par Bernard Duyck
    Publié dans : #Eruptions historiques
    White terraces - Photo C. Spencer, 1880.

    White terraces - Photo C. Spencer, 1880.

    Before the eruption of Tarawera:

    The Okataina volcanic center, with a rhyolitic dominance, is surrounded by extensive ignimbrite and layers of pyroclastic materials produced in multiple eruptions formative calderas. Many craters and lava domes form a northeast / southwest line belonging to volcanic complex Haroharo and Tarawera.

    The caldera Haroharo, 16km of 26, gradually formed between 300,000 years ago and 50,000 years. Lava domes occupy a part of the caldera.

    The complex Tarawera, south of the center Okataina, consists of 11 domes of rhyolitic lava and flows associated. Their dating ranges between 15,000 and there are 800 years.

    The volcanic center Okataina and Tarawera eruption fissure of 1886 - a click to enlarge - Doc. http://users.skynet.be/etna/NZ/Tarawera.htmThe volcanic center Okataina and Tarawera eruption fissure of 1886 - a click to enlarge - Doc. http://users.skynet.be/etna/NZ/Tarawera.htm
    The volcanic center Okataina and Tarawera eruption fissure of 1886 - a click to enlarge - Doc. http://users.skynet.be/etna/NZ/Tarawera.htm

    The volcanic center Okataina and Tarawera eruption fissure of 1886 - a click to enlarge - Doc. http://users.skynet.be/etna/NZ/Tarawera.htm

    White terraces ... before the destruction - photo NZ holiday homes

    White terraces ... before the destruction - photo NZ holiday homes

    The eruption of Tarawera in 1886:

    Since the year 1310, when occurred the Kaharoa eruption of VEI 5, Mount Tarawera was "calm" ...

    On 1 June 1886, the waters of Lake Rotomahana are troubled by strange waves. A local Maori priest interpreted the phenomenon as the appearance of a spirit -canoë representing the harbinger of a terrible future event ... legendary interpretation conveyed by tourists of the time.

    At 0:30 on June 10, local residents were awakened by violent tremors marking the start of the eruption.

    The initial phase is phreatomagmatic type, resulting from the rise of a basaltic magma -  different from the other eruptions with rhyolitic magma - and he met the groundwater at a depth of 300 meters below surface.

    At 1:30, the side of Wahanga dome explodes, opening a crack. The opening step by step and the expansion of the eruptive fissure resulting in a series of 13 craters through the Tarawera dome complex.
     

    The eruption of Tarawera June 10, 1886 - doc.Waimangu.co.nz

    The eruption of Tarawera June 10, 1886 - doc.Waimangu.co.nz

    The main Plinian phase Plinian generates an eruptive column about 30 kilometers high, according to the analysis of deposits, and could have stopped after four hours. A study of deposits nearby the crack corroborates the testimonies of several smaller eruption columns feeding the main Plinian column. We now think that vents 4 craters, located in an area between the tuff cone Ruawahia and the southwest portion of the Tarawera Dome, contributed to the establishment of the Plinian column. During the Plinian phase, lower vents in a section northeast of the crack had a strombolian activity.

    At the end of the Plinian phase, a brief phreatomagmatic phase took place, perhaps as a result of a further collapse of the summit of the magma column in the groundwater.

    This eruption, described by the GVP of VEI 5, opened a rift 17 km long across the top of the mountain, through the Lake Rotomahana and into the Waimangu Valley. A mixture of steam and finely pulverized
    rock, known as the "Mud of Roromahana" formed by the phreatic / phreatomagmatic massive eruptions, has spread as a base surge over 4-6 km, causing destruction and death. Although some deaths are directly caused by this surge, most were attributed to the collapse of roofs caused by the accumulation of wet ash. Villages were destroyed and instead the site of Pink and White terraces, a crater deep more 100 meters open.

    Steam eruptions continued for several months in this crater, but in fifteen years, a new Rotomahana lake was formed, larger than the previous. The chain of craters in the Waimangu area became the seat of new geothermal structures, and the largest hot spring in New Zealand, Frying Pan Lake.

     

    The eruptive fissure of the Tarawera - photo C.Lindberg

    The eruptive fissure of the Tarawera - photo C.Lindberg

    Mount Tarawera - photo Gerald ViaBloga

    Mount Tarawera - photo Gerald ViaBloga

    Waimangu - active fumaroles in the  geothermal area - photo Antony Van Eeten

    Waimangu - active fumaroles in the geothermal area - photo Antony Van Eeten

    Sources :

    - GNS - Okataina Volcanic Centre/ Mt Tarawera Volcano

    - Te Ara – Historic volcanic activity – Tarawera

    - Global Volcanism Program – Okataina

     

    Lire la suite

    Publié le par Bernard Duyck
    Publié dans : #Eruptions historiques
    White terraces - photo C. Spencer, 1880.

    White terraces - photo C. Spencer, 1880.

    Avant l’éruption du Tarawera :

    Le centre volcanique Okataina, à dominance rhyolitique, est entouré d’ignimbrites extensives et de couches de matériaux pyroclastiques produits au cours de multiples éruptions formatrices de caldeira. De nombreux dômes de laves et cratères forment une ligne nord-est / sud-ouest appartenant aux complexes volcaniques Haroharo et Tarawera.

    La caldeira Haroharo, de 16 km sur 26, s’est progressivement formée entre il y a 300.000 ans et 50.000 ans. Les dômes de lave occupent une partie de cette caldeira.

    Le complexe Tarawera, au sud du centre Okataina, est constitué de 11 dômes de lave rhyolitique et des coulées associées. Leur datation s’échelonne entre il y a 15.000 et 800 ans.

    Le Centre volcanique Okataina et la fissure éruptive du Tarawera 1886 - un clic pour agrandir - doc. http://users.skynet.be/etna/NZ/Tarawera.htmLe Centre volcanique Okataina et la fissure éruptive du Tarawera 1886 - un clic pour agrandir - doc. http://users.skynet.be/etna/NZ/Tarawera.htm
    Le Centre volcanique Okataina et la fissure éruptive du Tarawera 1886 - un clic pour agrandir - doc. http://users.skynet.be/etna/NZ/Tarawera.htm

    Le Centre volcanique Okataina et la fissure éruptive du Tarawera 1886 - un clic pour agrandir - doc. http://users.skynet.be/etna/NZ/Tarawera.htm

    White terraces ... avant leur destruction - photo NZ holiday homes

    White terraces ... avant leur destruction - photo NZ holiday homes

    L’éruption du Tarawera en 1886 :

    Depuis l’an 1310, époque à laquelle s’est produite l’éruption Kaharoa de VEI 5, le Mont Tarawera était " calme " …

    Le 1° juin 1886, les eaux du lac Rotomahana sont troublées d’étranges vagues. Le prêtre Maori local a interprété le phénomène comme l’apparition d’un esprit -canoë représentant le présage d’un futur horrible évènement … interprétation légendaire véhiculée par les touristes de l’époque.

    A 0h30 le 10 juin, les habitants locaux sont réveillés par de violents tremblements marquant le début de l’éruption. La phase initiale  est de type phréatomagmatique, résultante de la montée d’un magma basaltique – et différent du magma rhyolitique d’autres éruptions – et de sa rencontre avec les eaux souterraines à une profondeur de 300 mètres sous la surface. A 1h30, le flanc du dôme Wahanga explose, ouvrant une fissure. L’ouverture par étapes et l’élargissement de la fissure éruptive résultent en une série de 13 cratères au travers du complexe de dômes Tarawera.

    L'éruption du Tarawera du 10 juin 1886 - doc.Waimangu.co.nz

    L'éruption du Tarawera du 10 juin 1886 - doc.Waimangu.co.nz

    La phase principale plinienne génère une colonne éruptive d’environ 30 kilomètres de haut, d’après l’analyse des dépôts, et pourrait avoir cessé au bout de quatre heures. Une étude des dépôts proches de la fissure corrobore les témoignages faisant état de de plusieurs colonnes éruptives plus petites alimentant la colonne plinienne principale. On pense aujourd’hui  que les évents de 4 cratères , situés dans une zone comprise entre le cône de tuff Ruawahia et la portion sud-ouest du dôme Tarawera, ont contribué à l’établissement de la colonne plinienne. Au cours de cette phase plinienne, des évents plus faibles situés dans la section nord-est de la fissure ont eu une activité  strombolienne.

    A la fin de la phase plinienne, une brève phase phréatomagmatique  a pris place, peut-être à la suite d’un nouvel effondrement du sommet de la colonne magmatique dans les eaux souterraines.

    Cette éruption, qualifiée par le GVP de VEI 5, a ouvert un rift de 17 km de long à travers le sommet de la montagne, au travers du lac Rotomahana et jusque dans la vallée de Waimangu. Un mélange de vapeur et de roche finement fragmentée, connue sous le nom de " Boue de Roromahana ", formé par les éruptions phréatiques / phréatomagmatiques massives , s’est propagé comme un base surge sur 4 à 6 km, causant destruction et morts. Bien que certains décès soient causés directement par ce surge, la plupart fut attribué à l’effondrement des toits sous l’accumulation de cendres humides. Des villages furent détruits et à la place du site des Pink & White terraces, un cratère profond de plus de 100 mètres s’est ouvert.

    Des éruptions de vapeur continuèrent durant plusieurs mois dans ce cratère, mais en quinze années, un nouveau lac Rotomahana s’est formé, plus grand que le précédent. La chaîne de cratères dans la zone de Waimangu est devenu le siège de nouvelles structures géothermales, et de la source chaude la plus importante de Nouvelle-Zélande, Frying Pan lake.

    La fissure éruptive du Tarawera - photo C.Lindberg

    La fissure éruptive du Tarawera - photo C.Lindberg

    Le Mont Tarawera - photo Gerald Viabloga

    Le Mont Tarawera - photo Gerald Viabloga

    Waimangu - fumerolles actives dans la zone géothermale - photo Antony Van Eeten

    Waimangu - fumerolles actives dans la zone géothermale - photo Antony Van Eeten

    Sources :

    - GNS - Okataina Volcanic Centre/ Mt Tarawera Volcano

    - Te Ara – Historic volcanic activity – Tarawera

    - Global Volcanism Program – Okataina

    http://volcano.si.edu/volcano.cfm?vn=241050

    Lire la suite

    Publié le par Bernard Duyck
    Publié dans : #Eruptions historiques

    Voici sept ans, débutait une éruption soudaine et puissante, qualifiée de VEI 4, dans la caldeira du volcan Okmok , dans le centre de l’arc des Aléoutiennes.

    Le 12 juillet 2008, l’activité éruptive commence, seulement quelques heures après une subtile augmentation de la sismicité, suivie d’une courte séquence d’essaim sismique, le tour remarqué rétrospectivement.

    Les premières explosions ont emporté une partie du cône intracaldérique D, dans le secteur centre-est de la caldeira large de 10 km. La phase le plus énergétique a lieu au cours des dix premières heures d’activité. Les données du satellite GOES et la comparaison avec le modèle de dispersion des cendres Puff indiquent une hauteur de la colonne éruptive initiale de 16 km environ.

    Okmok éruption et panache du 12 juillet 2008 - doc. AVO

    Okmok éruption et panache du 12 juillet 2008 - doc. AVO

    Okmok - émissions du dioxyde de soufre cumulées du 12 au 20.07.2008 - doc. NILU /  Nasa Earth Observatory

    Okmok - émissions du dioxyde de soufre cumulées du 12 au 20.07.2008 - doc. NILU / Nasa Earth Observatory

    Au cours des cinq semaines suivantes, plusieurs centaines de millions de mètres-cubes de téphras et de dépôts de lahars vont recouvrir une grande partie du nord-est de l’île Umnak. Au sein de la caldeira, des explosions hydrovolcaniques presque en continu vont accumuler plusieurs dizaines de mètres de téphras humide et à grains fins. L’activité explosive va complètement perturber la nappe phréatique et les eaux stagnantes dans la caldeira ; un nouveau cône de téphra va s’édifier, atteignant au final 200 mètres de haut. Cette éruption est le premier évènement volcanique à dominance phéatomagmatique marquant les Etats-Unis depuis l’éruption du maar Ukinrek (au nord de l’arc des Aléoutiennes) en 1977.

    Le 23 juillet, de nombreux lahars sont remarqués par un fermier ; leur formation n’est pas identifiée avec certitude : remobilisation des cendres par la pluie,  condensation de vapeur d’eau syn-éruptive, perte d’eau lors de chutes de cendres humides, fonte des neiges, ou combinaison de plusieurs facteurs ?

    Le panache éruptif , vu le 3 août 2008 d’un avion d’Alaska Airlines volant à une altitude de 10,7 km – photo Burke Mees

    Le panache éruptif , vu le 3 août 2008 d’un avion d’Alaska Airlines volant à une altitude de 10,7 km – photo Burke Mees

    Les 2 et 3 août, le panache éruptif augmente en hauteur, en force et en charge de cendres ; ceci coïncide avec une hausse de l’amplitude du trémor. Ce rehaussement d’activité fait élever le niveau d’alerte aviation au Rouge par l’AVO. Durant les deux premières semaines d’août, l’intensité de l’éruption et la hauteur du panache diminuent, et les émissions de cendres cessent le 19 août. Un survol laisse voir un unique évent contenu dans un cône de téphra aux parois abruptes.

    Des observations de terrain en septembre, combinées à l’analyse des photos vont cependant indiquer que l’éruption s’est produite au départ d’une série d’évents, qui se sont ouverts au cours des deux premières semaines, et disposés sur une ligne de 2 km dans la caldeira. Un cône de téphra s’est édifié au-dessus de l’évent 2008 actif le plus longtemps. L’explosion et l’effondrement des cratères à l’ouest du cône D ont formé une dépression qui s’est rempli d’eau et formé un lac de 0,6 km².

    Plus de détails sur le site de l’AVO.

    Caldeira de l'Okmok - le cône et le lac nouvellement formés - doc. AVO

    Caldeira de l'Okmok - le cône et le lac nouvellement formés - doc. AVO

    Sources :

    - AVO / Alaska Volcano Observatory - link

    - Global Volcanism Program - Okmok

    Lire la suite

    Publié le par Bernard Duyck
    Publié dans : #Eruptions historiques

    The year 2015 marks the centenary of the explosive eruption of Lassen Peak, located in the south of the Cascades volcanic Range. From a volume of 2 cubic kilometers and dominant the environmeny of around 600 meters, the Lassen Peak is the largest dacite lava dome on earth. It is established, there are about 27,000 years, on the northeast side of a now extinct stratovolcano, Mount Tehama.


    On 22 May 1915 the Lassen Peak explodes, devastating the nearby areas and dropped a rain of ashes up to 300 km east of the volcano. This eruption has changed forever the landscape and led to the creation of the National Park of the same name.

    The eruptive plume Lassen Peak, viewed from Red Bluff May 22, 1915 - Archive F.R.Eldredge wordpress

    The eruptive plume Lassen Peak, viewed from Red Bluff May 22, 1915 - Archive F.R.Eldredge wordpress

    The eruption of Lassen Peak 1914-1917:


    The explosion of May 22 is the strongest of a series of eruptions that characterize the episode of 1914-1947; this series is the latest to have rocked the Cascades Range before the eruption of St. Helens in 1980.
    The eruptive episode begins on May 30, 1914, with a phreatic explosion from the summit of Lassen Peak. During the following years, 180 steam explosions dug a 300 meters wide crater at the top.

    Lassen Peak in 1914, before the explosive eruption - photo of the Devastated area by BFLoomis / USGS

    Lassen Peak in 1914, before the explosive eruption - photo of the Devastated area by BFLoomis / USGS

    Lassen Peak - Steam Explosion and blast of June 14, 1914 at 9:45 am - photo BFLoomis of Manzanita Lake, 10 km from Lassen Peak / via Shasta County

    Lassen Peak - Steam Explosion and blast of June 14, 1914 at 9:45 am - photo BFLoomis of Manzanita Lake, 10 km from Lassen Peak / via Shasta County

    Lassen Peak - the summit crater, October 12, 1914, blown by the steam explosions in May - photo BFLoomis / via USGS

    Lassen Peak - the summit crater, October 12, 1914, blown by the steam explosions in May - photo BFLoomis / via USGS

    From mid-May 1915, the eruption changes of character, with the extrusion of a lava dome in the summit crater. This dome will expand to the west and the east extending beyond the walls of the crater. On May 19, a large explosion sprayed the dacitic dome, creating a new summit crater. Incandescent blocks fall on the top and the upper slopes of Lassen Peak, covered with a thick layer of snow. An avalanche of snow and lava blocks will travel 6,500 meters and spend Emigrant Pass, a pass used by the pioneers. The large rock, dubbed "Hot rock" by Loomis, is a piece of the lava dome carted away by the avalanche (see map below).

    On May 22, an explosive eruption is accompanied by a pyroclastic flow that devastates an area which extends up to 6 km northeast of the crater. It is called from “the Devastated Area of ​​Lassen Volcanic Park” (8 km²); this area have still little tree, following the low in nutrients and an high soil porosity.

    Lassen Peak - the Devastated area "Before & after" 1915/1984 - Doc. USGS archive

    Lassen Peak - the Devastated area "Before & after" 1915/1984 - Doc. USGS archive

    Lassen Peak - Devastated area created by the explosion of 19.05 - the "Hot Rock", still a hot boulder at the photo taken by BF Loomis between 19 and 05.22.1915 - Archive VI-PH-C1. 63 / Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Lassen Peak - Devastated area created by the explosion of 19.05 - the "Hot Rock", still a hot boulder at the photo taken by BF Loomis between 19 and 05.22.1915 - Archive VI-PH-C1. 63 / Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Deposits of eruptions and lahars of Lassen Peak 1915-1917 - Doc. USGS

    Deposits of eruptions and lahars of Lassen Peak 1915-1917 - Doc. USGS

    The eruptive column rises vertically to more than 9,500 meters above the crater and deposited a lobe of pumice tephra  over 30 km to ENE. Fine ash is found to Winnemucca, Nevada, more than 325 km. east of Lassen Peak.

    These events are causing more snow melt, that feeds mudflows / lahars and flooding of Lost Creek and Hat Creek valley on more than 20 kilometers.

    Lassen peak - the eruptive plume 05/22/1915 - photo RE Stinson - Archive VI-PH-C1.192 - Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Lassen peak - the eruptive plume 05/22/1915 - photo RE Stinson - Archive VI-PH-C1.192 - Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Lassen Peak from the west, shortly after the eruptive climax of 22 May 1915. The hot pumice fallout on the snow covered flanks of the volcano generated low-volume lahars more viscous and not reaching the base of Lassen Peak, unlike the lahars pf 19-20.05.15  - photo BF Loomis - Archive VI-PH-C1.27 Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Lassen Peak from the west, shortly after the eruptive climax of 22 May 1915. The hot pumice fallout on the snow covered flanks of the volcano generated low-volume lahars more viscous and not reaching the base of Lassen Peak, unlike the lahars pf 19-20.05.15 - photo BF Loomis - Archive VI-PH-C1.27 Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Intermittent eruptions will succeed until mid 1917 ... the percolation of snow meltwater engendered steam explosions, indicating the heat below the surface. In May 1917, a very strong steam explosion blew the northernmost crater. Steam vents could still be at the top into the 50s, but are difficult to detect today.
    The total volume of 1915 eruptions is relatively low, about 0.03 cubic kilometers, compared to the well-known St Helens eruption  in 1980, of the order of 1 cubic km.
    Today, the Lassen Peak is dormant, but steam vents, hot springs and bubbling mud pools still exist in the Lassen Volcanic National Park.

    The Lassen Peak in 2012 - photo Fotopedia

    The Lassen Peak in 2012 - photo Fotopedia

    A collector : the poster of Lassen Volcanic National Park - published in 1938 by the National Park Service

    A collector : the poster of Lassen Volcanic National Park - published in 1938 by the National Park Service

    Sources :

    - USGS - A Sight “Fearfully Grand”—Eruptions of Lassen Peak, California, 1914 to 1917 - By Michael A. Clynne, Robert L. Christiansen, Peter H. Stauffer, James W. Hendley II, and Heather Bleick - link

    - Photos d'archives : Lassen NPS on Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/lassennps  / creative commons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

    - Flickr Lassen peak eruption - link

    Lire la suite

    Publié le par Bernard Duyck
    Publié dans : #Eruptions historiques

    L’année 2015 marque le centième anniversaire de l’éruption explosive du Lassen Peak, situé dans le sud de la Chaîne volcanique des Cascades.

    D’un volume de 2 km³ et dominant les environs de 600 mètres, le Lassen Peak constitue le plus grand dôme de lave dacitique sur terre. Il s’est établi, il y a environ 27.000 ans, sur le flanc nord-est d’un stratovolcan disparu aujourd’hui, le Mont Tehama.

    Le 22 mai 1915, le Lassen Peak explose, dévaste les zones proches et fait tomber une pluie de cendres jusqu’à 300 km à l’est du volcan. Cette éruption a changé pour toujours le paysage et a conduit à la création du Parc National du même nom.

    Le panache éruptif du Lassen Peak, vu de Red Bluff  le 22 mai 1915 - archives F.R.Eldredge wordpress

    Le panache éruptif du Lassen Peak, vu de Red Bluff le 22 mai 1915 - archives F.R.Eldredge wordpress

    L’éruption du Lassen Peak 1914-1917 :

    L’explosion du 22 mai est la plus forte d’une série d’éruptions caractérisant l’épisode de 1914-1917 ; cette série est la dernière à avoir secoué la Chaîne des Cascades avant l’éruption du St Helens en 1980.

    L’épisode éruptif débute le 30 mai 1914, avec une explosion phréatique du sommet de Lassen Peak. Au cours de l’année suivante, 180 explosions de vapeur ont creusé un cratère de 300 mètres de large au sommet.

    Lassen Peak en 1914, avant l’éruption explosive – photo de la Devastated area par B.F.Loomis / USGS

    Lassen Peak en 1914, avant l’éruption explosive – photo de la Devastated area par B.F.Loomis / USGS

    Lassen Peak - Explosion de vapeur et blast du 14 juin 1914 à 9h45 – photo B.F.Loomis du Manzanita lake, à 10 km de Lassen Peak  / via  Shasta County

    Lassen Peak - Explosion de vapeur et blast du 14 juin 1914 à 9h45 – photo B.F.Loomis du Manzanita lake, à 10 km de Lassen Peak / via Shasta County

    Lassen Peak - le cratère sommital, le 12 octobre 1914, soufflé par les explosions de vapeur de mai - photo B.F.Loomis / via USGS

    Lassen Peak - le cratère sommital, le 12 octobre 1914, soufflé par les explosions de vapeur de mai - photo B.F.Loomis / via USGS

    A partir de la mi-mai 1915, l’éruption change de caractère, avec l’extrusion d’un dôme de lave dans le cratère sommital. Ce dôme va s’étendre vers l’ouest et l’est débordant les parois du cratère.

    La seconde photo ci-dessous, prise le 22 mai 1915, montre les destructions dues aux avalanche et lahar des 19 et 20 mai . Le 19 mai, une importante explosion pulvérise le dôme de dacite, créant un nouveau cratère sommital. Les blocs incandescents retombent sur le sommet et les flancs supérieurs du Lassen Peak, recouverts d’une épaisse couche de neige. Une avalanche de neige et blocs de lave va parcourir 6.500 mètres et passer Emigrant Pass, un col emprunté par les pionniers. Le gros rocher, baptisé " Hot rock " par Loomis, est un morceau du dôme de lave charrié à distance par l’avalanche (voir carte ci-dessous).

    Le 22 mai, une éruption explosive s’accompagne d’une coulée pyroclastique qui dévaste une zone qui s’étend jusqu’à 6 km au nord-est du cratère. Elle est appelée depuis la "Devastated Area du Lassen volcanic Park" (8 km²) ; cette zone est toujours peu arborée, suite au faible niveau en nutriments et la haute porosité du sol.

    Lassen Peak - la Devastated area "Before & after"  1915 / 1984 - doc. archives USGS

    Lassen Peak - la Devastated area "Before & after" 1915 / 1984 - doc. archives USGS

    Lassen Peak -  Devastated area créée par l'explosion du 19.05 -  le "Hot rock", un bloc de roche toujours chaud au moment de la photo prise par B.F. Loomis entre le 19 et la 22.05.1915  - Archive VI-PH-C1.63 / Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Lassen Peak - Devastated area créée par l'explosion du 19.05 - le "Hot rock", un bloc de roche toujours chaud au moment de la photo prise par B.F. Loomis entre le 19 et la 22.05.1915 - Archive VI-PH-C1.63 / Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Dépôts des éruptions et lahars du Lassen Peal 1915-1917 - doc. USGS

    Dépôts des éruptions et lahars du Lassen Peal 1915-1917 - doc. USGS

    La colonne éruptive monte verticalement à plus de 9.500 mètres au-dessus du cratère et dépose un lobe de tephra ponceux sur 30 km vers l’ENE. Des cendres fines sont retrouvées jusqu’à Winnemucca, au Nevada, à plus de 325 km. à l’est du Lassen Peak.

    Les évènements de mai causent une fonte des neiges qui alimente des coulées de boue/ lahars, et l’inondation des drainages de Lost Creek et Hat Creek valley, sur plus de 20 kilomètres.

    Lassen peak – le panache éruptif du 22.05.1915 – photo R.E. Stinson - Archive VI-PH-C1.192 - Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Lassen peak – le panache éruptif du 22.05.1915 – photo R.E. Stinson - Archive VI-PH-C1.192 - Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Lassen Peak de l’ouest peu après le climax éruptif du 22 mai 1915. Les retombées de ponces chaudes sur les flancs couverts de neige du volcan ont généré des lahars de faible volume et plus visqueux n’atteignant que la base de Lassen Peak, contrairement aux lahars des 19-20.05.15  - photo B.F. Loomis -  Archive VI-PH-C1.27 Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Lassen Peak de l’ouest peu après le climax éruptif du 22 mai 1915. Les retombées de ponces chaudes sur les flancs couverts de neige du volcan ont généré des lahars de faible volume et plus visqueux n’atteignant que la base de Lassen Peak, contrairement aux lahars des 19-20.05.15 - photo B.F. Loomis - Archive VI-PH-C1.27 Lassen NPS / Flickr

    Des éruptions intermittentes vont se succéder jusqu’en milieu 1917… la percolation des eaux de fonte neigeuse engendrèrent des explosions de vapeur, indication de la chaleur présente sous la surface. En mai 1917, une explosion de vapeur très vigoureuse fait sauter le cratère le plus au nord. Des évents de vapeur pouvaient encore se trouver au sommet jusque dans les années 50, mais sont difficilement détectables aujourd’hui.

    Le volume total des éruptions de 1915 est relativement faible, environ 0,03 km³, comparée à celle bien connue du St Helens en 1980, de l’ordre de 1 km³.

    Aujourd’hui, le Lassen Peak est en dormance, mais des évents de vapeur, des sources chaudes et des mares de boue bouillonnantes existent toujours dans le Lassen Volcanic National Park.

    Le Lassen Peak en 2012 - photo Fotopedia

    Le Lassen Peak en 2012 - photo Fotopedia

    un collector : le poster du Lassen Volcanic National Park - éditée en 1938 par le National Park Service

    un collector : le poster du Lassen Volcanic National Park - éditée en 1938 par le National Park Service

    Sources :

    - USGS - A Sight “Fearfully Grand”—Eruptions of Lassen Peak, California, 1914 to 1917 - By Michael A. Clynne, Robert L. Christiansen, Peter H. Stauffer, James W. Hendley II, and Heather Bleick - link

    - Photos d'archives : Lassen NPS on Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/lassennps  / creative commons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

    - Flickr Lassen peak eruption - link

    Lire la suite

    1 2 3 4 5 > >>

    Articles récents

    Hébergé par Overblog