Overblog
Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog

Earth of fire

Actualité volcanique, Article de fond sur étude de volcan, tectonique, récits et photos de voyage

Articles avec #excursions et voyages catégorie

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Excursions et voyages

Like every winter, I can not resist sharing some pictures of the Yellowstone National Park at that time.

 Castle geyser - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Castle geyser - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Hot Spring of West Thumb Basin and Yellowstone Lake frozen - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Hot Spring of West Thumb Basin and Yellowstone Lake frozen - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Lower falls in the Yellowstone Grand Canyon - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Lower falls in the Yellowstone Grand Canyon - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Passage of bisons by Roosevelt Arch at the North entrance - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Passage of bisons by Roosevelt Arch at the North entrance - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Coyote hunting in Round Prairie, near Pebble Creek Campground. - Photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Coyote hunting in Round Prairie, near Pebble Creek Campground. - Photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Although the Yellowstone hydrothermal system has been mapped in surface, it remains largely unknown in its subsurface.

A new study by the USGS and the universities of Wyoming and Aarhus (Denmark) began on 7 November. A low-flying helicopter, equipped with an electromagnetic system, resembling to a giant "hula hoop", will analyze the Mammoth-Norris corridor, the Upper and Lower basins and the northern part of the Yellowstone Lake, hoping to distinguish the zones of cold water, hot saline water, steam, clay and unaltered rock areas ... and to better understand the various hydrothermal systems of the Yellowstone and their connection with the deep magmatic system.

Source: NPS

Hélico and its giant "hula hoop" occupied with electromagnetic measurements over hot springs - photo around the firehole river / NPS

Hélico and its giant "hula hoop" occupied with electromagnetic measurements over hot springs - photo around the firehole river / NPS

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Excursions et voyages

Comme chaque hiver, je ne résiste pas à partager quelques photos du Parc National du Yellowstone à cette époque.

Castle geyser - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Castle geyser - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Source chaude du bassin de West Thumb et la lac Yellowstone gelé - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Source chaude du bassin de West Thumb et la lac Yellowstone gelé - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Lower falls dans le Grand canyon du Yellowstone - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Lower falls dans le Grand canyon du Yellowstone - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Passage de bisons par Roosevelt Arch à l'entrée Nord - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Passage de bisons par Roosevelt Arch à l'entrée Nord - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Coyote chassant à Round Prairie, près de Pebble Creek Campground. - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Coyote chassant à Round Prairie, près de Pebble Creek Campground. - photo Yellowstone forever / 11.2016

Bien que le système hydrothermal du Yellowstone ait été cartographié en surface, il reste en grande partie inconnu en subsurface.

Une nouvelle étude de l'USGS et des universités du Wyoming et d'Aarhus (Danemark) a débuté le 7 novembre. Un hélicoptère volant à basse altitude , équipé d'un système électromagnétique, ressemblant à un " hula hoop " géant va analyser le corridor Mammoth-Norris, les Upper et Lower basins et la partie nord du lac du Yellowstone, avec espoir de distinguer les zones d'eaux froides, d'eau chaudes salines, de vapeur, d'argile et les zones de roches non altérées ... et de mieux comprendre les différents systèmes hydrothermaux du Yellowstone, et leur liaison avec le système magmatique profond.

Source : NPS

Hélico et son "hula hoop" géant occupé à des mesures électromagnétiques au dessus des sources chaudes; ici la Firehole river - doc. NPS

Hélico et son "hula hoop" géant occupé à des mesures électromagnétiques au dessus des sources chaudes; ici la Firehole river - doc. NPS

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Excursions et voyages
 Gunnuhver - steam vents are visible from far away - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Gunnuhver - steam vents are visible from far away - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Close to Reykjanesviti is Gunnuhver, a high-temperature geothermal area and an Icelandic exception: the infiltration water, probably mixed with seawater, is heated by magma, and the steam that emanates reaches over 300 ° C. These waters rich in chlorides and loaded with silica, can constitute cones of geyserite.

Gunnuhver -  deposits and geyserite cones - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Gunnuhver -  deposits and geyserite cones - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Gunnuhver -  deposits and geyserite cones - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

The peninsula is subjected to seismic swarms which caused a slide on a crack passing through Gunnuhver some forty years ago; the earthquake of 1918 had formed a powerful geyser with a bubble of 5 meters, named "Hverinn 1918". Reactivated in September 1967 by an earthquake, it erupted with a jet of more than 12 meters of height. A geothermal drilling ended its existence in 1983. The mouths of the two ancient geysers are visible in Kisilholl (Silica hill).
Water acidified by gases, mainly carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide, altered the volcanic rocks and transformed them into mud pots.
Vapors leaving the ground have increased in importance after the start of industrial operations in 2006. From 2008 to 2010, the area was partially closed by the Civil Defense due to the eruptive risk. The destruction of the footbridges on 15 September 2014 confirmed the danger.

Gunnuhver - destruction of a boardwalk on 15.09.2014 - photo VF-myndir Hilmar Brag

Gunnuhver - destruction of a boardwalk on 15.09.2014 - photo VF-myndir Hilmar Brag

Gunnuhver - the place remained as it was in 2016 - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Gunnuhver - the place remained as it was in 2016 - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

The name Gunnhuver derives from that of a ghost, Guðrún Önundardóttir, nicknamed "Gunna". According to one of the common legends about it, she was a farmer near Kirjubol, a property belonging to a lawyer, Vihjalmur Jonsson. When Gunna did not honor the payment of his rent, Vihjalmur took away his only property, a pot. Gunna became furious, refused to drink the holy water and fell dead. On the way to the cemetery, the bearers of his coffin noticed that it became strangely lighter. And when the grave was dug, the people heard : " No need deep to dig, no plans long to lie " ... it was obviously Gunna who spoke, now become a hateful specter ! The next night, Vihjalmur's body was found on the moor, all blue and broken bones ... Gunna's revenge.
Another story tells that a priest named Eirikur felt capable of exorcism, and finally threw Gunna into a geyser, which took his name. According to the tales of the time, you should be able to see it refusing to grow there.

Gunnnuhver - Explanatory panel of the legend of "Gunna" - a click to enlarge Gunnnuhver - Explanatory panel of the legend of "Gunna" - a click to enlarge 

Gunnnuhver - Explanatory panel of the legend of "Gunna" - a click to enlarge 

A project called IDDP / Iceland Deep Drilling Project, initiated in the 2000s, aims to study the feasibility and economic benefits of deep geothermal resources as possible sources of energy.
The first IDDP-1 well was drilled at Krafla in 2009, with the intention of reaching 4,500 meters in depth, but at less than 2,100 meters, the drilling reached melted rock and the drilling stopped.

Magma well at Krafla: Temperature World Record - Landsvirkjun - National Power Company of Iceland

The site of the IDDP-2 to the left of the lighthouse of Reykjanes. - photo IDDP

The site of the IDDP-2 to the left of the lighthouse of Reykjanes. - photo IDDP

The IDDP-2 project involves deepening the existing RN-15 well in the Reykjanes geothermal field.
The drilling, begun on 12 August 2016, reached 3,640 meters at the end of October. The objective remains to drill to a depth of 5,000 meters, in an extension of the Medio-Atlantic ridge, in search of a supercritical vapor zone, according to Albert Albertsson, deputy director of ORKA, a Icelandic geothermal energy.

The magma heats the water under the ocean floor, where there is a pressure of the order of 200 atmospheres ... the water will be found there in the state of "supercritical steam": it is neither a liquid state, nor a gaseous state, sharing the properties of both, but more importantly, it can store more energy than other states.
The use of supercritical geothermal fluids could produce ten times more power than older wells.

Reykjanes drilling well RN15 / IDDP-2 - photo IDDP

Reykjanes drilling well RN15 / IDDP-2 - photo IDDP

A project to follow, since the technique under development in Iceland could be used by other countries in the world.


Sources:
- IDDP - Iceland Deep Drilling Project - link

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Excursions et voyages
 Sandvik - left, the American plate, right the Eurasian plate - photos © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - left, the American plate, right the Eurasian plate - photos © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - the sides of the fissure ... basalt - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Sandvik - the sides of the fissure ... basalt - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - the sides of the fissure ... basalt - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Descending to the south of the Reykjanes peninsula, we find to Sandvik a "bridge between two continents": this ugly little pedestrian bridge spans a fine fissure that marks the (theoretical) boundary between the American and Eurasian tectonic plates, and the place where they deviate. Lava walls are separated by a zone of depressed volcanic black sand.

Sandvik - an unstable block that will soon choose to transit to another continent - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - an unstable block that will soon choose to transit to another continent - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - the "bridge between two continents" - click to enlarge - photo © Bernard Sandvik - the "bridge between two continents" - click to enlarge - photo © Bernard

Sandvik - the "bridge between two continents" - click to enlarge - photo © Bernard

Continue to Valahnúkur and Reykjanesviti.


At the tip of the peninsula, the first Icelandic lighthouse, Reykjanesviti, was built there in 1878. Earthquakes in 1905 and the waves of the Atlantic will weaken it; A new lighthouse was built in 1907-1908 on the Baerjarfell hill, 26 meters high, emitting at 69 meters above sea level two flashes every 30 seconds.

 Reykjanes lighthouse - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Reykjanes lighthouse - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Near the lighthouse, the cliffs of Valahnúkur face a sea often unleashed.
This landscape was formed by underwater eruptions of Surtseyen type at the end of the Weicheselian (or Vistula) glaciation.

Valahnúkur - cliffs facing the Atlantic - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Valahnúkur - cliffs facing the Atlantic - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Valahnúkur - cliffs facing the Atlantic - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Surrounding Valahnúkur, the young lava Stampar cover 4.2 km²; They date from a volcano-tectonic episode, called "the Reykjanes fires" dated 1211-1240, which left a group of craters and pahoehoe flows, staggered over 4 km on a NE-SW axis.

Near the cliffs, surtsey eruptions produced the Vatnsfell cone, then the Karl cone; These two tuff cones overlap and are still visible 300 meters from the shore.

The Stampar young lava surround Valahnúkur - picture © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
The Stampar young lava surround Valahnúkur - picture © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

The Stampar young lava surround Valahnúkur - picture © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

The tuff cone Karl, produces by the "Reykjanes fires" - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

The tuff cone Karl, produces by the "Reykjanes fires" - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

15 km off Valahnúkur, Eldey, a 77-meter high basaltic hyaloclastite rock, and a seabird paradise, is the most representative of islets located on a small submarine ridge called Fuglasker or Eldeyjar. One of these islands sheltered the last colonies of great Penguin (Pinguinus impennis). The great penguin was considered extinct in 1844, the last bird shot by hunters on Eldey. A bronze of this giant unable to fly, realized by the American artist Tood McGrain, is placed in Valahnúkur and looks towards Eldey.

On the horizon, on the right, the silhouette of Eldey, a paradise for birds - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

On the horizon, on the right, the silhouette of Eldey, a paradise for birds - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

The statue of the Great Penguin contemplating the place of its disappearance, Eldey - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

The statue of the Great Penguin contemplating the place of its disappearance, Eldey - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

To follow: Gunnuhver and the IDDP project


Sources:
- Geomorphology - Elaboration of a typology of the deposits of supratidal blocks of cliff tops of the Reykjanes peninsula (Iceland) - R.Autret et al.
- Reykjanes UNESCO Global Geopark - link
- Geometry, formation and development of tectonic fractures on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwest Iceland - A.Gudmundsson & al.

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Excursions et voyages
Sandvik - à gauche, la plaque Américaine, à droite la plaque Eurasienne -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - à gauche, la plaque Américaine, à droite la plaque Eurasienne - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - les côtés de la fissure ... basalte -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Sandvik - les côtés de la fissure ... basalte -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - les côtés de la fissure ... basalte - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

En descendant toujours vers le sud de la péninsule de Reykjanes, on trouve à Sandvik " un pont entre deux continents " : ce moche petit pont piétonnier enjambe une belle fissure qui marque la limite (théorique) entre les plaques tectoniques Américaines et Eurasienne, et l'endroit où elles s'écartent. Des parois de lave sont séparées par une zone de sable volcanique déprimée.

Sandvik - un bloc instable qui va bientôt choisir de transiter vers un autre continent -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - un bloc instable qui va bientôt choisir de transiter vers un autre continent - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - le " pont entre deux continents" - un clic pour agrandir -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016Sandvik - le " pont entre deux continents" - un clic pour agrandir -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sandvik - le " pont entre deux continents" - un clic pour agrandir - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Poursuite vers Valahnúkur et Reykjanesviti.

A la pointe de la péninsule, le premier phare islandais, Reykjanesviti, y fut construit en 1878. Des séismes en 1905 et les vagues de l'Atlantique en auront raison ; un nouveau phare est bâti en 1907-1908 sur la colline Baerjarfell,  : haut de 26 mètres, il émet à 69 mètres au dessus du niveau de la mer deux flashes toutes les 30 secondes.

Le phare de Reykjanes -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Le phare de Reykjanes - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Près du phare, les falaises de Valahnúkur affrontent une mer souvent déchaînée.

Ce paysage a été formé par des éruptions sous-marines, de type Surtseyen à la fin de la glaciation Weicheselienne (ou de la Vistule).

Valahnúkur -  les falaises affrontent l'Atlantique -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Valahnúkur -  les falaises affrontent l'Atlantique -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Valahnúkur - les falaises affrontent l'Atlantique - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Entourant Valahnúkur, les jeunes laves Stampar couvrent 4,2 km² ; elles datent d'un épisode volcano-tectonique, appelé "les feux de Reykjanes" daté de 1211-1240, qui ont laissé un groupe de cratères et des coulées pahoehoe, échelonnés sur 4 km sur un axe NE-SO. A proximité des falaises, des éruptions surtseyennes ont produit le cône Vatnsfell, puis le cône Karl ; ces deux cônes de tuff se recouvrent et sont toujours visible à 300 mètres du rivage.

Les jeunes laves Stampar entourent Valahnúkur -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Les jeunes laves Stampar entourent Valahnúkur -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Les jeunes laves Stampar entourent Valahnúkur - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Le cône de tuff Karl, produit des "Feux de Reykjanes" -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Le cône de tuff Karl, produit des "Feux de Reykjanes" - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

A 15 km. au large de Valahnúkur, Eldey, un rocher de hyaloclastites basaltiques haut de 77 mètres, et paradis pour les oiseau marins, constitue le plus représentatif des îlots situés sur une petite dorsale sous-marine appelée Fuglasker ou Eldeyjar. Un de ces îlots abrita la dernière colonies de grand Pingouin (Pinguinus impennis). Le grand pingouin fut considéré comme éteint en 1844, le dernier exemplaire abattu par des chasseurs sur Eldey. Un bronze de ce géant incapable de voler, réalisé par l'artiste Américain Tood McGrain, est placé à Valahnúkur et regarde vers Eldey.

Sur l'horizon, à droite, la silhouette d'Eldey, un paradis pour les oiseaux -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sur l'horizon, à droite, la silhouette d'Eldey, un paradis pour les oiseaux - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

La statue du Grand pingouin contemplant le lieu de sa disparition, Eldey -  photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

La statue du Grand pingouin contemplant le lieu de sa disparition, Eldey - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

A suivre : Gunnuhver et le projet IDDP

Sources :

- Géomorphologie - Elaboration d’une typologie des dépôts de blocs supratidaux de sommets de falaise de la péninsule de Reykjanes (Islande) – R.Autret & al.

- Reykjanes UNESCO Global Geopark - link

- Geometry, formation and development of tectonic fractures on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwest Iceland - A.Gudmundsson & al.

 


 

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Excursions et voyages
Les systèmes de fissures en échelon de la péninsule de Reykjanes.

Les systèmes de fissures en échelon de la péninsule de Reykjanes.

La Reykjanesskagi, littéralement “la péninsule du cap des fumées”, plus communément appelée péninsule de Reykjanes, comprend une large zone de cratères basaltiques post-glaciaires et de petits volcans boucliers, à l'endroit où la dorsale médio-Atlantique s'élève au dessus du niveau marin.

Le système volcanique sous-marin Reykjaneshryggur est contigu et considéré comme partie prenante du système volcanique de Reykjanes / Svartsengi, la plus occidentale d'une série de quatre systèmes de fissures en échelon qui s'étendent en diagonale à travers cette péninsule. 

Garðskagi (Garður) - le vieux phare - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Garðskagi (Garður) - le vieux phare - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Les petits chevaux islandais résistent par tous les temps et dans tous les milieux - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Les petits chevaux islandais résistent par tous les temps et dans tous les milieux - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Les petits chevaux islandais résistent par tous les temps et dans tous les milieux - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

La péninsule est recouverte de laves holocènes. Des éruptions subaériennes se sont produites pendant les temps historiques, au XIIIe siècle à plusieurs endroits sur le système de fissures à tendance NE-SO, et de nombreuses éruptions sous-marines à Reykjaneshryggur datant du 12ème siècle ont été observés, dont certains ont formé des îles éphémères.

Notre voyage nous mène de la pointe nord-ouest, du phare Garðskagi , par la route côtière (45 puis 425), vers Reykjanesviti, le plus vieux phare d'Islande.

L'église de Sandgerði. Hvalsneskirkja, en pierres basaltiques - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

L'église de Sandgerði. Hvalsneskirkja, en pierres basaltiques - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Le phare d'Hafnir avant l'averse qui s'annonce -photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Le phare d'Hafnir avant l'averse qui s'annonce -photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Kirkjuvogskirkja, ancienne église d'Hafnir - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Kirkjuvogskirkja, ancienne église d'Hafnir - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Seuls points de repère dans le paysage, les phares et églises : à Hafnir, Kirkjuvogskirkja a été construite en 1860-61 et rénovée en 1970-72 est la plus ancienne église de la péninsule de Reykjanes. Édifiée sur l'emplacement d'un édifice du 14 ° siècle. Lorsque l'actuel bâtiment fut construit et financé par la même personne, il a coûté le prix de 300 vaches, selon une méthode populaire d'estimation des prix à l'époque.

Le champ de lave Hafnaheiði au sud d'Hafnir - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Le champ de lave Hafnaheiði au sud d'Hafnir - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Le champ de lave Hafnaheiði au sud d'Hafnir - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Entre Hafnir et la pointe de Reykjanes, les volcans-boucliers Langholl et Bergholl ont produit des champs de lave étendus, à l'origine, pour le second volcan, des falaises d'Hafnaberg.

L'immense champ de lave Bergholl à traverser pour arriver aux falaisese d'Hafnaberg ... ne pas s'éloigner du sentier et des cairns sous peine de se perdre - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

L'immense champ de lave Bergholl à traverser pour arriver aux falaisese d'Hafnaberg ... ne pas s'éloigner du sentier et des cairns sous peine de se perdre - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Les falaises basaltiques d'Hafnaberg - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Les falaises basaltiques d'Hafnaberg - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sources : 

- Guide des volcans d'Europe et des Canaries - M.Krafft et F.D.de Larouzière - éd. Delachaux & Niestlé
- Global Volcanism Program - Reykjanes

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Excursions et voyages
Au loin, le Snaefellsjökull - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Au loin, le Snaefellsjökull - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Un col enneigé à passer et quelques dykes sur les hauteurs - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Un col enneigé à passer et quelques dykes sur les hauteurs - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Un col enneigé à passer et quelques dykes sur les hauteurs - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

En descendant des fjords du nord-ouest, nous verrons au passage différentes structures volcaniques et géothermales.


Gabrokargigar forme un petit champ volcanique appartenant au système volcanique Ljosufjöll, un des trois systèmes d'évents fissuraux du Snaefellsnes, qui court sur 90 km depuis les champs Berserkjahraun jusqu'au village de Bifröst. 
Situé à une trentaine de kilomètres au nord de Borgarnes, en borfure de la route circulaire n°1, il se compose de trois spatter cones et de leur production.
Stóra Grábrók (le grand cratère), Litla Grábrók (le petit, à cause de lexploitation qui a précédé la protection du site) et Grábrókarfell sont composés de basaltes alcalins à olivine datés de moins de 3.600 ans.

 

Gabrokargigar - Stóra Grábrók, le grand cratère - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Gabrokargigar - Stóra Grábrók, le grand cratère - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Gabrokargigar - Stóra Grábrók et Litla Grábrók, deux des trois spatter cones - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Gabrokargigar - Stóra Grábrók et Litla Grábrók, deux des trois spatter cones - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, la source chaude de Deildartunga, serait par son volume la plus importante au monde. Son débit moyen est de 180 litres d'eau à 100°C par seconde. Son potentiel énergétique est d'environ 62 mégawatts, en intégrant celui des deux puits artificiels. L'extraction moderne se fait par pompage, car Deildartunguhver n'est situé qu'à 19 mètres au dessus du niveau marin.
Cette eau chaude, en provenance supposée de précipitations vieilles de 1000 ans sur le plateau dominant la vallée de Borgarfjördur, est utilisée depuis 1925 pour le chauffage domestique. L'entreprise de chauffage urbain d'Akranes et Borgarfjördur gère un réseau long de 74 km. La température moyenne à l'arrivée dans les habitations varie entre 65 et 77°C.

Deildartunguhver, la source chaude de Deildartunga - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Deildartunguhver, la source chaude de Deildartunga - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, la source chaude de Deildartunga - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, une des sources et son cône de déjection - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Deildartunguhver, une des sources et son cône de déjection - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, une des sources et son cône de déjection - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, les vapeurs de l'exploitation géothermale se confondent dans le brouillard hivernal ambiant - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, les vapeurs de l'exploitation géothermale se confondent dans le brouillard hivernal ambiant - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Hraunfossar, littéralement "les cascades du champ de lave", dénomme une série de petites cascades qui s'étire sur environ 1.000 mètres. L'eau de la rivière Litlafjlót ruisselle sous le champ de lave Grahraun avant de s'y jeter dans la rivière Hvítá.
Le Grahraun a été produit par l'éruption d'un des volcans situés sous le glacier Langjökull.

Hraunfossar - cascades dans les laves du Grahraun - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Hraunfossar - cascades dans les laves du Grahraun - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Hraunfossar - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Hraunfossar - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

 Lave cordée du Grahraun, érodée par le passage et le temps - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Lave cordée du Grahraun, érodée par le passage et le temps - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Une autre cascade proche, Barnafoss – la cascade des enfants, est associée à l'histoire locale : Le jour de noël, toute la maisonnée de Hraunsas s'était rendue à la messe, à l'exception de deux enfants restés à la maison. Au retour de la famille, les enfants avaient disparus... mais leurs traces menaient à l'arche de pierre qui enjambait la rivière.Ils en étaient tombés et s'étaient noyés. La mère fit abattre ce pont naturel pour empêcher que d'autres ne connaissent le même funeste sort.

Barnafoss - pont de lave - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Barnafoss - pont de lave - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Le Langjökull vu de Hraunfossar - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Le Langjökull vu de Hraunfossar - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sources :
Outline of Geology of Iceland - Chapman Conference 2012 - by Thor Thordarson

 

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Excursions et voyages
In the background, the Snaefellsjökull - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

In the background, the Snaefellsjökull - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

A snowy pass and some dykes on the heights - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
A snowy pass and some dykes on the heights - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

A snowy pass and some dykes on the heights - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Going down from the northwest fjords, we will see various volcanic and geothermal structures.


Gabrokargigar forms a small volcanic field belonging to the Ljosufjöll volcanic system, one of the three fissuring vents systems of the Snaefellsnes, which runs over 90 km from the Berserkjahraun fields to the village of Bifröst.
Located about thirty kilometers north of Borgarnes, in the borough of Circular Road No. 1, it consists of three spatter cones and their production.
Stóra Grábrók (the big crater), Litla Grábrók (the small one, because of the exploitation that preceded the protection of the site) and Grábrókarfell, are composed of alkaline olivine basalts dated less than 3,600 years old.

Gabrokargigar - Stóra Grábrók, the big crater - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Gabrokargigar - Stóra Grábrók, the big crater - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Gabrokargigar - Stóra Grábrók et Litla Grábrók, 2 spatter cones - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Gabrokargigar - Stóra Grábrók et Litla Grábrók, 2 spatter cones - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, the hot spring of Deildartunga, would be, by its volume, the largest in the world. Its average flow rate is 180 liters of water at 100 ° C per second. Its energy potential is about 62 megawatts, integrating that of the two artificial wells. Modern extraction is done by pumping, as Deildartunguhver is only 19 meters above sea level.
This hot water, coming from 1000 years old precipitations on the plateau overlooking the Borgarfjördur valley, has been used since 1925 for domestic heating. The district heating company of Akranes and Borgarfjördur is responsible of a 74 km long network. The average temperature at arrival in the houses varies between 65 and 77 ° C.

Deildartunguhver, the hot spring of Deildartunga - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Deildartunguhver, the hot spring of Deildartunga - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, the hot spring of Deildartunga - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, one of the hot springs and its runoff  - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Deildartunguhver, one of the hot springs and its runoff  - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, one of the hot springs and its runoff - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, the vapors of the geothermal exploitation are confused in the ambient winter fog - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Deildartunguhver, the vapors of the geothermal exploitation are confused in the ambient winter fog - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Hraunfossar, literally the waterfalls of the lava field, denominates a series of small waterfalls that stretches for about 1,000 meters.

The river Litlafjlót flows under the Grahraun lava field before flowing into the Hvítá river.
The Grahraun was produced by the eruption of one of the volcanoes under the Langjökull glacier.

Langjökull  seen from Hraunfossar - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Langjökull seen from Hraunfossar - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Hraunfossar - waterfalls in the lava of Grahraun - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Hraunfossar - waterfalls in the lava of Grahraun - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Hraunfossar - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Hraunfossar - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Corded lava of the Grahraun, eroded by passage and time - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Corded lava of the Grahraun, eroded by passage and time - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Another nearby waterfall, Barnafoss - the children's waterfall, is associated with local history: On Christmas day, the entire household of Hraunsas went to the church, with the exception of two children staying at home. When the family returned, the children had disappeared ... but their traces led to the stone arch that spanned the river. They had fallen and drowned. The mother had this natural bridge shoot down to prevent others from experiencing the same fatal fate.

Barnafoss, the lava bridge - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Barnafoss, the lava bridge - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Sources:
Outline of Geology of Iceland - Chapman Conference 2012 - By Thor Thordarson

 

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Excursions et voyages
Ísafjarðardjúp - 1 ° fjord - picture © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Ísafjarðardjúp - 1 ° fjord - picture © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

 Ísafjarðardjúp - basalt traps - the house gives the scale - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Ísafjarðardjúp - basalt traps - the house gives the scale - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

We will go, for waste of time, only to part of the Ísafjarðardjúp.
Ísafjarðardjúp means in English "the deep frozen fjord"; It extends 120 km inland, and branches off in many smaller fjords on its southwestern shore.

The Road 61 in Iceland marked in red, with tunnels in grey. This map was created from OpenStreetMap project data, collected by the community.

The Road 61 in Iceland marked in red, with tunnels in grey. This map was created from OpenStreetMap project data, collected by the community.

On the opposite side, the only great glacier in this region, the Drangajökull dominates the landscape. It is characterized by its low average altitude of only 635 meters ... what compensates his location : approximately 66 ° north.

The present glacier is the rest of an enormous group which covered during the dryas (18,000 to 11,700 years before our era) all this peninsula and the Glama plateau.
A progressive deglaciation of the plateaus and heights, starting from about 26,000 years ago, then led to rock slides on the western peripheries of the peninsula.

Drangajokull, the only Icelandic northwestern glacier - photo Johann Dréo

Drangajokull, the only Icelandic northwestern glacier - photo Johann Dréo

The ice cap of the Drangjökull and the emissary glaciers

The ice cap of the Drangjökull and the emissary glaciers

At the tip of Isafjördur, near Reykjanes (the village, not the peninsula much to the south), the road intersects the plateau and reveals different layers more or less rich in iron oxides.

The Isafjördur, near Reykjanes - cut in the plateau - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

The Isafjördur, near Reykjanes - cut in the plateau - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

The low density of the habitat is beneficial to wildlife: the waters of these fjords are home to many common eiders, crested mergansers, singing swans, and seal colonies (Phoca vitulina), as in the Skötufjördur.
This same fjord gratifies us with small photogenic falls that cascade on strange blistered structures.

Skötufjördur. Cascadelle dressed the walls - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Skötufjördur. Cascadelle dressed the walls - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Common Eider - photo digiscopie

Common Eider - photo digiscopie

Seals making "the banana" in Skötufjördur. - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Seals making "the banana" in Skötufjördur. - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Skötufjördur. - bubbles in the basalt - a click to enlarge - photos © Bernard Duyck
Skötufjördur. - bubbles in the basalt - a click to enlarge - photos © Bernard Duyck
Skötufjördur. - bubbles in the basalt - a click to enlarge - photos © Bernard Duyck

Skötufjördur. - bubbles in the basalt - a click to enlarge - photos © Bernard Duyck

To the north, the farm of Litlibaer, built in 1895, testifies to the habitat of this century. Surrounded by a stone wall, the property covered three hectares ... the house made only 3.9 m. on 7,4 m., with sheds serving as kitchen.

Litlibaer - the farmhouse - picture © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Litlibaer - the farmhouse - picture © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Ísafjarðardjúp, in summer - with archive pictures - video Harpa Halldorsdottir

Sources:
- Geomorphology - Distribution and spatial analysis of rockslides failures in the Icelandic Westfjords: first results - by Aurore Peras & al.
- Geomorphology and the Little Ice Age of the Drangajökull ice cap, NW Iceland, with focus on its three surge-type outlets - by Skafti Brynjolfsson & al.

Lire la suite

Publié le par Bernard Duyck
Publié dans : #Excursions et voyages
Ísafjarðardjúp - 1°fjord - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Ísafjarðardjúp - 1°fjord - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Ísafjarðardjúp - trapps basaltiques - la maison donne l'échelle - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Ísafjarðardjúp - trapps basaltiques - la maison donne l'échelle - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Nous n'allons remonter, faute de temps, qu'une partie de l'Ísafjarðardjúp.

Ísafjarðardjúp signifie en français " le profond fjord glacé "; il s'avance de 120 km dans les terres, et se ramifie en de nombreux fjords plus petits sur sa rive sud-ouest. 

La route 61 en rouge (en gris, les tunnels ) -Carte OpenStreetMap project data

La route 61 en rouge (en gris, les tunnels ) -Carte OpenStreetMap project data

Côté opposé, le seul grand glacier de cette région, le Drangajökull domine le paysage. Il se caractérise par sa faible altitude moyenne de seulement 635 mètres ... ce que compense se localisation : environ 66° nord. L'actuel glacier est le reste d'un énorme ensemble qui recouvrait au dryas (18.000 à 11.700 ans avant notre ère) toute cette péninsule et le plateau Glama.

Une déglaciation progressive des plateaux et des hauteurs, à partir d'il ya environ 26.000 ans, a entraîné ensuite des glissements rocheux sur les pourtours ouest de la péninsule.

Le Drangajokull , seul grand glacier du nord-ouest Islandais - photo Johann Dréo

Le Drangajokull , seul grand glacier du nord-ouest Islandais - photo Johann Dréo

La calotte glaciaire du Drangjökull et les glaciers émissaires

La calotte glaciaire du Drangjökull et les glaciers émissaires

A la pointe de l'Isafjördur, près de Reykjanes (le village, pas la péninsule beaucoup plus au sud), la route recoupe le plateau et laisse apparaître différentes couches plus ou moins riche en oxydes de fer.

l'Isafjördur, près de Reykjanes - coupe dans la plateau - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

l'Isafjördur, près de Reykjanes - coupe dans la plateau - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

La faible densité de l'habitat est propice à la vie sauvage : les eaux de ces fjords abritent de nombreux eiders à duvet, harles huppés, cygnes chanteurs, et des colonies de phoques communs (Phoca vitulina), comme dans le Skötufjördur.

Ce même fjord nous gratifie de petites chutes photogéniques qui cascadent sur d'étranges structures boursouflées.

Skötufjördur.  parois habillés de cascadelles - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Skötufjördur. parois habillés de cascadelles - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Eider à duvet - photo digiscopie

Eider à duvet - photo digiscopie

Phoques faisant "la banane" dans le Skötufjördur. - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Phoques faisant "la banane" dans le Skötufjördur. - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Skötufjördur. - bulles dans le basalte - un clic pour agrandir - photos © Bernard Duyck 10.2016Skötufjördur. - bulles dans le basalte - un clic pour agrandir - photos © Bernard Duyck 10.2016
Skötufjördur. - bulles dans le basalte - un clic pour agrandir - photos © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Skötufjördur. - bulles dans le basalte - un clic pour agrandir - photos © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Plus haut, la ferme de Litlibaer, construite en 1895, témoigne de l'habitat de ce siècle. Entouré d'un muret de pierre, la propriété couvrait trois hectares ... l'habitation ne faisait quantà elle que 3,9 m. sur7,4 m., avec des appentis servant de cuisine.

Litlibaer - l'habitation de la ferme - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Litlibaer - l'habitation de la ferme - photo © Bernard Duyck 10.2016

Ísafjarðardjúp ,en été - avec des photos d'archives - vidéo Harpa Halldorsdottir

Sources :

- Géomorphologie - Distribution and spatial analysis of rockslides failures in the Icelandic Westfjords: first results – by Aurore Peras & al.

- Geomorphologie and the little Ice age of the Drangajökull ice cap, NW Iceland, with focus on its three surge-type outlets – by Skafti Brynjolfsson & al.

Lire la suite

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 > >>

Articles récents

Hébergé par Overblog